Turtle and Rabbit’s Big Race

Lesson Guide

Who Will Win, Turtle or Rabbit?

Lesson Guide

Hop Rabbit, Jog Turtle

Lesson Guide

When Mom is Away the Cubs Will Play

Lesson Guide

Kim Finds M and N Words

Lesson Guide

Datiz Finds Vivid F and V Words

Lesson Guide

Tim Finds H and W Words

Lesson Guide

Kim Looks for K and G Words

Lesson Guide

Who is Sleeping?

Lesson Guide

Naptime

Lesson Guide

Imprimir

Activity 1 Making Predictions from the Book Cover

Read the Title (Who Will Win? Turtle or Rabbit) with students. Then look at the illustration on the cover to have students predict what the story is about. Help students to think about what the title and the picture together help us predict about the characters and the setting called the set-up of the story.


Predict:

Who are the characters? (I see a turtle and a rabbit .)

What is the setting? (It looks like they are outside in a field or park.)

What are the characters doing? (They are getting ready to have a race.)


Think-aloud: “I see a turtle and a rabbit and it looks like they are getting ready to race. The title says, “Who Will Win? The Turtle or Rabbit? So I predict the book will be about a race between the two characters and at the end we will find out who wins.

Activity 2 Word Work

Sounding Out Words and Recognizing Words

Before students read the book on their own practice these activities to prepare them to read the words accurately.  


Phonemic Awareness: Point a finger for each sound you hear in a word.

Words with 3 sounds: pet, path, dash, end, wish, chat, shock

Words with 4 sounds: fox, test, fast, last, flash, champ, plod

Note: Remember that a digraphs (th, sh, ch, -ck) represent only one sound (phoneme).

Consonant blends (st, fl, sn,dr,cr,gr,br) represent 2 distinct sounds (phonemes).

The letter x represents two distinct sounds /ks/(phonemes).


Sound-by-sound blending: Sound-by-sound blending for closed-syllable words: plods, wish, test, best, chat, path, flash, champ, drips.

Note: Remember the blend spelled dr represents the phonemes /jr/.

  • On wipe-off boards, have students give the sound as you spell each word letter by letter. Have students blend the consonant  sounds with the vowel sound.
  • Example: plods
    • Write the letter p
    • Say: sound (Students respond  /p/).
    • Write the letter l.
    • Say: sound (students respond  /l/) .
    • Write the letter o.
    • Say: sound: /ŏ/  
    • Say: blend (Students respond /plŏ/)  
    • Write the letter d.  
    • Say: sound (Students respond /d/).
    • Write the letter s.
    • Say: sound (Students respond /s/)   
    • Say: blend (Students respond /plŏds/)  

Word Chain: (Letter cards: p,e,t,b,s,ch,l,r,a,m,c) Students have to listen for the sound that changes in each word and change their own cards or erase the letter on their board to change it to a letter to represent the sound change.  

Follow the steps for the word chain.


High-frequency words: about, didn’t, for, now, to, because, don’t, go, off, who, began, down, like, play, your, behind, does, mark, says, could, far, never, soon, who, want

  1. Students can gain more practice reading high-frequency words from the chart at the end of the book.
  2. Practice the high-frequency words in the context of a CLOZE sentence (fill in the missing word with a word that makes sense).

It is important to note that the example sentences below already contain high frequency words, so students can fill in the blanks with their ideas and  practice reading the completed sentence.  

________says, “ On your mark get set, Go!”(Fill in blank with student names)

I could play _________________. (Fill in the bank with the name of a game or sport.)

I don’t want to _________________because _______________________. (Fill in with ideas that make sense).


Phoneme-grapheme map for blends:

  1. Tap out the sounds in the word.
  2. Spell with students each sound in the word.
  3. Remind students that digraphs (e.g. ch, -ck, sh) represent one sound so both letters go in the same box.
  4. For dr blend students will hear the blend  /jr/, but in English we spell the sound blend /jr/ with the letters d-r.  
  5. Remind students that a blend (e.g., fl, br, dr, -mp,sn) has more than one sound so each sound of the blend gets a separate box.

Each space is a sound block. Only one sound can be printed in each space.


Syllable Division: lesson, began, cricket

  1. Clap the number syllables in the word.
  2. Divide each word between the two consonants (les/son) or keep letters of the digraph together (crick/et) or divide before the consonant if there is only one consonant (be/gan).
  3. Have students read each syllable with you and then blend the two syllables together.
    • les- ,-son, crick-, -et are closed syllables and have a short vowel sound.  
    • -be- is an open syllable and has a long vowel sound.

Activity 3 Individual Reading with Feedback from Teacher

The students read the text and sound out words they don’t know.  While other students are reading, the teacher listens to one student read at a time and gives the student feedback on their pronunciation. Help them sound out the word (segment) and then put the sounds back together (blend).  The challenging words in this book are words that have a beginning or ending blend or inflectional ending -s: drifts, drips, left, best, champ, brags, plods, drops etc.  Also a few words have the r-controlled vowel spelled ar (far, mark).

Activity 4 Choral Reading for Fluency Practice

My Turn, Your Turn

The teacher reads a line from the text and the students follow in their books with their finger. Then the students read the same line.  Look to see if students are pointing to each word.


Example:

Teacher: My turn. “Rabbit brags to Turtle, “I can hop so fast. You will be last if we run down the path.” Your turn.

Students: “Rabbit brags to Turtle, “I can hop so fast. You will be last if we run down the path.”


Choral Reading: The teacher and students read the text at the same time.

Activity 5 Comprehension Practice

Reread each page of the text with students. Guide students to understand the story and make inferences with help from the illustrations.  Ask questions that require inferences based on careful attention to the text and/ or pictures.

Do a think-aloud to help students understand how both the words and illustrations together help us understand the story. Ask text-dependent questions that help guide students to understand how the story details and author’s craft enhances the story message. Important steps in the close reading process are:

  • Students reread parts of the book to show the evidence for their answers to the questions the teacher asks.
    • Example: What did the Rabbit brag to Turtle? (Rabbit bragged that he will win the race because he can hop fast. )
    • Read me the part that tells what Turtle said back to Rabbit. (“Hush Rabbit. Let’s run down the path for a test to see who is best”).
  • Teachers help students make inferences about what happens in the story, how the characters’ feel, or what they are thinking. The teacher guides students to tell why they think something happens using the words and pictures as evidence to support their inference.
    • Example: Why do you think Rabbit took a nap? (Answer: Because he did not think Turtle could catch up to him. My evidence is that the text says “Turtle cannot pass me.”)
    • Why did Bird think Rabbit could beat Turtle? (They knew that rabbits move fast, and turtles moves slower.)  
    • What is the evidence that Bird thinks Rabbit will win? (Bird says, “ Not so fast, Turtle will never last.” )  
    • How did the Fox and Bird feel at the end of the story? (happy, glad, excited)  
    • How do you know?( by their expressions and the text says that “Fox is glad”.)
  • Teacher ask questions that have the students react to the story.
    • Example: How did you feel when Turtle won the race?
  • Teacher asks questions at different English oral language levels to encourage the participation of all students, including those students that are not yet speaking English. Students at lower oral language levels can respond by pointing to what they can understand or acting out the meaning of a word or event.

Text-Dependent Questions

On each page there are questions to ask students for  different levels of English language development.

*After one student gives an answer to a question, the teacher repeats the correct answer in a complete sentence.

*Ask the students who gave the answer to show the other students where the answer came from in the book or picture.

Page 2 Text: As the kids chat, Rabbit rests and Turtle snacks.

Oral Language level 1:

Point to the kids.  Point to pets. Point to the rabbit.  Point to the turtle.

Oral Language level 2:

Where are the kids and the pets? (in a classroom)

How do you know?(see the bulletin board, wipe board)

Oral Language level 3:

What does chat mean? (Talk to each other.)

What are Rabbit and Turtle doing?(Rabbit is resting. Turtle is snacking on spinach.)


Page 3 Text:  Rabbit brags to Turtle, “ I can hop so fast. You will be last if we run down the path.”  Turtle is mad. He says, “Hush Rabbit. Let’s run down the path for a test to see who runs the best.”

 

Oral Language level 1:

Point to the character that says, “ I can hop so fast. You will be last if we run down the path.”

Point to the character that says, “Hush Rabbit.”

Oral Language level 2 & 3:

What does brag mean? (to boast about yourself  or show-off)

Pretend you are Rabbit and read what he says so it sounds like you are bragging.

What does Turtle want to do? (have a race). Why?

Model a retell of  the set-up of the story for students and then let them try:

In a classroom there is a pet turtle and rabbit.  When the kids leave the classroom, the pets begin to chat.  Rabbit brags to Turtle that he is faster and can win a race down the path.  So Turtle challenges Rabbit to a race.


Page 4 Text: “I want Turtle to  win. I don’t like it when Rabbit brags,” says Fox.  

“Not so fast, Turtle will never last, “says Bird.

Oral Language level 1:

Point to Fox.  Point to Bird. Show me how Bird feels.  

Oral Language level 2 & 3:

Why does Fox want Turtle to win? (Because Rabbit is showing off.)

How do you think Bird feels? (He feels upset.)

Why is Bird upset? (Because he thinks that Turtle cannot beat Rabbit.)

Infer: Where will the race start? (Students should point to the place that is marked START on page 4 of the book.)  How do you know? (in the grass there is a place marked START).


Page 5  Text: Fox yells, On your mark, get set, GO!” Rabbit jumps fast.  He is off in a flash. Turtle lags far behind Rabbit.

Oral Language level 1:

Point to Rabbit.  Point to Turtle. Who is winning the race?

Oral Language level 2 & 3:

What does Fox say to start the race? (“On Your Mark. Get set. Go!”)

What does , “He is off in a flash mean.”? (Think of how fast a flash of light is. Off in a flash is an expression that means get going fast!).

Why is rabbit so far ahead of Turtle? ( Because he hops or jumps really fast.)

What does the author mean that Turtle “lags far behind.” (Explain to students that lags means you are not keeping up, so you are  far behind. The illustration helps us to see that Turtle is far behind Rabbit. Rabbit is ahead of Turtle. Also ‘far behind’ means far in distance from Rabbit.

Infer: Who do you predict will win the race?

Model a retell of the initiating event that starts the story action: Rabbit and Turtle lined up at the start line.  Next, Fox yelled, “On your mark, get set go.” Then the race started.  Rabbit was off in a flash and he leaves turtle far behind.


Page 6  Text: Soon Rabbit is so far down the path that he stops to rest.  He sees the kids play cricket. Then he drifts off to sleep.

Oral Language Level 1:

Point to Rabbit.  Show how the Rabbit feels.  Where are the kids?

Oral Language level 2 & 3:

What is Rabbit doing.  (He is resting.)

Infer: Why did he stop running in the race? (He is so far ahead of the Turtle he thinks he has time to rest.).

What happens? (He drifts off to sleep.)

What does it mean to drift off?  To slowly go from awake to sleep.

Infer: Predict what will happen.


Page 7 Text: As Rabbit sleeps, Turtle plods down the path.  “ I can do it,” says Turtle, and he passes Rabbit.  Turtle’s drips and drops hit the grass, but he does not stop.

Oral Language Level 1:

Point to Rabbit.  Act out what Rabbit is doing. Point to Turtle.  Who is napping?

Oral Language Level 2 & 3:

What happens while Rabbit is napping?(Turtle catches up.)

What does Turtle say? (I can do it!)

Infer: How does Turtle feel? (He feels determined to win.)

What does the phrase , “Turtle’s drips and drops hit the grass…” mean? (Turtle is sweating because he is working so hard to finish the race.)


Page 8 Text: When Rabbit gets up he says, “ I had a nap, and still  Turtle didn’t pass me. I will sprint so fast to the end of the path and win!” Rabbit yells.

Oral Language Level 1:

Point to rabbit. Act what Rabbit is doing? (stretching with energy)

Oral Language Level 2+:

What does the Rabbit think? (He thinks  Turtle is still behind him.)

What does the word sprint mean?(Guide students to use the clue “so fast,” to help them figure out that sprint means to run fast for a short time.)

Infer: What do you predict will happen in the race?


Page 9 Text: When Rabbit gets to the end, he is shocked to see Turtle in front of him at the finish line. Turtle is about to win. All the animals yell, “GO, TURTLE GO!

Rabbit yells,”NO, TURTLE NO!”

Oral Language Level 1:

Point to Turtle. Point to the finish line.  Point to the other animal characters. Show me what they are doing  ( cheering and saying, “Go!”)

Oral Language Level 2+:

Why is Rabbit shocked? (He thought Turtle was behind him, but instead he is about to win the race.)

What do the other animal characters  say? (Go, Turtle Go!).

Infer: Who is working harder now? (Rabbit because he is the one sweating.)


Page 10: Text: Turtle wins.  Fox is glad because now Rabbit can’t brag.  Rabbit says, “Turtle you are the champ! I think there is a lesson in this for me.”

Oral Language Level 1:

Point to the winner of the race.  Who says, “Turtle you are the champ?”

Oral Language Level 2+:

Have students go back to page 4 to read what Bird predicted about the race.  Read what Bird said on page 4 and compare it to what actually happened.(Bird thought Turtle would never last to the finish line.) What is Bird’s reaction on page 10?  How do you know? (Bird has flowers for Turtle.)

Infer: What does Bird think about Turtle winning the race? What is your evidence?

What does Rabbit say to Turtle?  What does that tell us about Rabbit? (Maybe he is a good sport because he complimented Turtle.)  Think about if Rabbit changed from the beginning of the story when he liked to brag about being the fastest of all.  Then compare what he said at the beginning of the story to what he said when Turtle won the race.


Page 11: Guide students to infer what is happening on page 11 using clues from the illustration.

 

 

 

 

 


Rereading/Dramatizing the story.

  • Talk about punctuation and how to read the exclamation mark (!).
  • Have students take the parts of different animals. Have a narrator read the story and assign other students to be each of the characters in the story.

Refer to the video on how to do Reader’s Theater.  Link: https://wordscientists.org/board-view/?id_drDcqFRxyA0_video_

Activity 6 Retell the Story

Model a retell of the story: Use the sequence words (first, next, then, after that, finally) and connecting words (but, so, because) when you retell the story. First, the teacher models a retell of the story using the sequence and connecting words. Then students can help the teacher tell parts of the story or fill in words when the teacher pauses.


Use the sequence words (first, next, then, after that, finally) and connecting words (but, so, because) when you retell the story.  These academic language word are bolded. Use the word decides or wants in the retell to help students understand the characters’ goals.


Students can practice retelling parts of the story. The teacher has the sequence words and connecting words on cards. Use the pictures from the story to help remember details of the story to retell.


Retell the story:

In a classroom there is a pet turtle and rabbit.  When the kids leave the classroom, the pets begin to chat.  Rabbit brags to Turtle that he is faster and can win a race down the path.   Turtle is annoyed  with Rabbit’s bragging and challenges Rabbit to a race.  The other animals hope Turtle will win because they don’t like it when Rabbit boasts.   First,  Fox says. “ On your mark get set, go “and the race begins.  Next, Rabbit hops fast and Turtle lags behind.  After awhile, Rabbit decides to rest because he is so far ahead of Turtle. He sits under a tree and watches the kids play cricket and drifts off to sleep.  While he is sleeping, Turtle passes him. After that, Rabbits wakes up and thinks Turtle is still way behind him. He sprints to the finish line. But when he gets there he is shocked to see that Turtle is already there.  Finally, Turtle crosses the finish line with all of his animal friends cheering him on.  Rabbit realizes that he lost because he took a nap.  He learned a lesson, but he is a good sport and tells Turtle, “You are the Champ.”


Discuss a story message with students.  Possible story messages are:

  • If you snooze, you lose.
  • Slow and Steady Wins the Race.
  • When you are overconfident, you may not try hard enough.
  • People don’t like show-offs.

Activity 7 Cut-up sentences

Prepare the sentences and then cut apart the words, but leave the punctuation in place

(e.g.,  period with the last word of the sentence) as a clue.

Guide students to use strategies to put the words back in order to make sense.

The pets began to chat.

Turtle will never last.

Rabbit jumps fast.

Turtle plods down the path.

Turtle is about to win.

Fox is glad because now Rabbit can’t brag.

Rabbit says, “Turtle you are the champ.”

Activity 8 Connecting the Spelling of the Word to its Grammatical Meaning

Make this chart and write and read the word sums with students.

  • Example of how to read the word sum: “h-o-p plus s is rewritten as hops.”
  • Listen to how the letter s is pronounced at the end of the word.

Activity 9 Wrap-Up

Write about the story message.

After students discuss possible story messages, have them choose one to write about.

Tell students to pick one of the posted story messages and find evidence from the story to support their choice.  

Post possible story messages such as those identified in Activity 6 in the lesson guide.

  • If you snooze, you lose.
  • Slow and Steady Wins the Race.
  • When you are overconfident, you may not try hard enough.
  • People don’t like show-offs.

Here is an academic language frame for students to use to support their written response.

In my opinion, the story message in the book, Who Will Win? Turtle or Rabbit , is

___________________________________________________.   My evidence is _____________________________________________________________. From what happens in the story, I can learn to_________________________.


Example of Completed Response Frame:

In my opinion, the story message in the book, Who Will Win? Turtle or Rabbit , is that no one likes bragging.  My evidence is that in the story, the animals wanted Turtle to win because they did not like it when Rabbit bragged. Also they yelled “Go Turtle, Go!” so I know they wanted Turtle to win.  From what happens in the story, I can learn to be a better friend and not brag about things I am good at.   

Activity 10 Word Reading Assessment

Student Name _______________

Date _____________

 

Record answers:

If the student sounded out the word before saying it write the letters with dashes (For example: ch-a-t  or ch-at) in the box. Mark a (+) in the box to show they could sound out the word and blend it back together. If the student recognized the word without sounding it out then just make a (+) mark in the box. If the student did not read the word correctly then write a (0) in the box. Count the number of  words read correctly and record it as ______correct/10.

 

Comment on vowel errors: ___________________________________

Comment on consonant errors: _____________________________

Comment on blend errors: _________________________________

Miscues (errors )  made in context: __________________________________________________________________________
Type of error: ______________________________________________________________________

Activity 1 Predict Using Title and Cover Illustration

Before doing this activity become familiar with the demonstration and explanation for Exploring the Book Cover activity.


Read the Title (Hop Rabbit, Jog Turtle) with students. Then look at the illustration on the cover to have students predict what the story is about.  Help students to think about what the title and the picture help us predict about the characters and the setting.  This is called the setup of the story.

Who are the characters? (turtle, rabbit)

What is the setting? (in a park, out in a field)

What are the characters doing? (Getting ready to race, hop, jog.)

Think-Aloud: Say: I see a rabbit and turtle lined up ready to hop or jog in a race near the woods. There is a fox nearby. The title says “hop rabbit” and I know that rabbits hop. It says “jog turtle” and I see a turtle. I know that turtles move slowly and they do not hop.

Activity 2 Word Work

Sounding Out Words and Recognizing Words

Before students read the book on their own practice these activities to prepare them to read the words accurately. Use pictures or act out the meaning of the words that will be practiced.


Phonemic Awareness: Point a finger for each sound you hear in a word as you segment the word into individual sounds (phonemes) and then blend the sounds back together.

  • Words with 3 sounds: sit, win, bet, nap, pass, hop
  • Words with 4 sounds: fox, hops, jogs

*The word fox is made up of 4 phonemes because the letter x represents two phonemes/ks/.


Sound-by-sound blending: Write the first letter of the word on the board and have students say the sound. Write the second letter and have students say the sound. After students pronounce the first vowel, blend the vowel and the consonant(s) that came before it together. Then continue to have students pronounce the last consonant sound(s) and then blend all the sounds of the word together. (win, sit, bet, nap, hop, hops, jogs).


Word Chain: Use letter cards: (b, s, p, i, t, e, u, h, g, j, o, f, w, n, a).

Before doing this activity become familiar with the demonstration and explanation for Word Chain activities.

In the word chain activity, students learn to listen for a one sound change as the teacher says the next word in the chain.  Students will listen for a change in one sound, the addition of a sound, or the deletion of a sound. They respond by making the change of letter(s) to represent the change of sounds. Announce the first word for students to spell.  After students spell the first word, say the following: “You are going to listen carefully to how I change each word by just one sound. You can only change one sound each time to spell a new word.”

Follow the steps for the word chain. Try to show a picture or explain the meaning of any words students don’t know.  Connecting spelling to meaning will help students to recognize words faster when they see them in print.

Follow the steps for the word chain.

  1. Say to students: Spell nap.
  2. Say: Change nap to nip.
  3. Say: Change nip to sip.
  4. Say: Change sip to sit.

  5. Say:

    Change

    sit

    to

    bit.

  6. Say: Change bit to bet.
  7. Say:  Change bet to but.
  8. Say: Change but to hut.
  9. Say: Change hut to hug.
  10. Say: Change hug  to jug.
  11. Say: Change jug to jog.
  12. Say:Change jog to fog.
  13. Say: Change fog to fig.
  14. Say: Change fig to wig.
  15. Say: Change wig to win.

High-frequency words

Word cards: you, will, see, I , go, and, says, me, by, and

Use the cover of the book.

I can go to________________. (fill in a place)

I cannot go to_____________. (fill in a place)

In the forest I will see a _________________.(any animal of the forest)

In the forest you will see a ________________and a _______________. (any animal of the forest)

Practice with these 2 sentences after reading the book:

The turtle says “___________________.” (fill in something the character might say)

The rabbit says “__________________.” (fill in something the character might say)

Activity 3 Individual Reading with Feedback from Teacher

Let students try to read the words in the book on their own. This allows students to apply their decoding skills to sound out the unfamiliar words in the book. The teacher can listen to one student read at a time and give each student individual help as needed with their pronunciation. When a student makes an error on reading a word, help that student to sound out the word and then blend the sounds back together. Try not to tell the word to the student, instead help the student sound it out.

Activity 4 Second Reading of Book: Do a choral reading of the book with students

My turn, Your turn. The teacher reads a line from the text and the students follow in their books and point to each word as the teacher reads it. Next, the students read the same sentence. Look to see if students are pointing to each word.

Example:  

My turn: As Rabbit naps and Turtle jogs by him.

Your turn: As Rabbit naps and Turtle jogs by him.

Use a Readers’ Theater Format to convert the story into a play. Check out the video under Who is Sleeping? To explain to your students how to do this.   

Link: https://wordscientists.org/board-view/?id_Jbgj3qldLYw_video_

Activity 5 Third Reading of Book: Comprehension and Oral Language Practice

Reread each page of the text with students. Guide students to understand the story and make inferences with help from the illustrations.  Ask questions that require inferences based on careful attention to the text or pictures.


Do a think-aloud to help students understand how both the words and illustrations help us understand the story. Ask text-dependent questions that help guide students to understand how the story details and author’s craft enhances the story message. Important steps in the close reading process are:

  • Students reread parts of the book to show the evidence for their answers to the questions the teacher asks.
    • Example: Read me the part that tells what Rabbit did.
  • Teachers help students make inferences about what happens in the story, how the characters’ feel, or what they are thinking. The teacher guides students to tell why they think something happens using the words and pictures as evidence to support their inference.
    • Example: Why do you think Rabbit took a nap? (Answer: Because he did not think Turtle could catch up to him. My evidence is that the text says “Turtle cannot pass me.”)
  • Teacher ask questions that have the students react to the story.
    • Example: How did you feel when Turtle won the race?
  • Teacher asks questions at different English oral language levels to encourage the participation of all students, including those students that are not yet speaking English. Students at lower oral language levels can respond by pointing to what they can understand or acting out the meaning of a word or event.

Text-Dependent Questions

On each page, there are questions for students who are at different levels of English language development.

After one student gives an answer to a question, the teacher models the correct answer in a complete sentence.

Ask the student who gave the answer where the answer came from in the book or picture  to show the other students.

Page 2  Text: Rabbit tells Turtle, “You will see. I will win.”

Oral Language Level 1:

Point to the character, Turtle. Point to the character, Rabbit. Point to the  character, Fox. Point to the character, Bird. Point to the character, Deer.

Oral Language Level 2:

What are the characters doing? (They are getting ready for a race.)

What does the Rabbit say? (“You will see. I will win.”)

Oral Language Level 3:

Infer: Why does Bird look mad or annoyed? (Maybe Bird doesn’t like that Rabbit is bragging.)

How do you think Bird feels when Rabbit brags that he will win? (Bird looks annoyed.)

Infer: Why does Rabbit think he will win? (Answers may include that Rabbit knows he can hop fast and that a turtle walks very slowly.)


Page 3  Text: “1,2,3,GO!” yells Fox.  Rabbit hops and Turtle jogs.

Oral Language Level 1:

Point to who is first.  Point to who is last. Point to Fox

Oral Language Level 2 & 3:

How does the rabbit move? (The rabbit hops.)

How does the turtle move? (The turtle jogs.)

Infer: Why is Rabbit ahead of Turtle? Answers can include the speed at which each animal moves. Discuss the difference between ways of moving.  Ask students which is faster.

Model Retell of the Setup of the story:

One day Turtle and Rabbit decide to have a race. Rabbit brags that he will win. Then, Fox says,” 1,2,3,GO!” Rabbit hops fast and gets ahead of Turtle.


Page 4 Text: Rabbit says, “I can sit and sit. Turtle cannot pass me.”

Oral Language Level 1:

Point to Rabbit. Show me with an action how Rabbit  feels. (Look tired, maybe yawn and stretch).

 

Oral Language Level 2 & 3:

What does Rabbit do? (He stops to sit under a tree)

What does Rabbit say about Turtle? (“Turtle cannot pass me.”)

Infer: Why does Rabbit think Turtle cannot pass him? (Because he knows he can hop faster than Turtle. Turtle moves very slowly and is far behind Rabbit.)


Page 5  Text: Rabbit naps and Turtle jogs by him.

Oral Language Level 1:

Point to Turtle. Show me with an action what Rabbit is doing. (napping)

Oral Language Level 2 & 3:

How do you think Turtle feels? What is your evidence? (Students should notice the sweat dripping from Turtle showing how hard he is trying. He feels tired but determined.)

Infer: What do you think Turtle is thinking as he passes by Rabbit? (Answers may vary.)

Infer: What can you predict will happen next?


Page 6  Text: Rabbit gets up. “Turtle will not pass me,“ yells Rabbit.

Oral Language Level 1: With an action, show me what Rabbit does. (Stretch out arms as if waking up.)

Oral Language Level 2 & 3:

What happens next? (Rabbit wakes up.)

What does Rabbit think happened to Turtle?   (He is far behind him.)

Infer: What really happened to Turtle? (He passed Rabbit.) Where is Turtle? (getting near finish line.)


Page 7 Text: But Turtle did pass Rabbit. Turtle wins!

Oral Language Level 1:

Point to Turtle. Point to Rabbit. Point to the finish line. Tell me how Turtle feels.

Oral Language Level 2 & 3:

Who wins the race? (Turtle wins the race.)

Infer: How do you think Turtle feels when he wins? (proud, happy, sad, glad, excited) How do you know?

How do you think Rabbit feels? (disappointed, surprised, shocked,) Why do you think he feels that way?


Page 8  Text. “If you nap, you cannot win,” says Rabbit.”

Point to the character that won the race? Which characters are happy? (Deer, Turtle, Fox, Bird)

Oral Language Level 2 & 3:

How do you think Turtle feels at the end of the story? (proud, excited, thrilled) Why do you think he feels that way?

How do Turtle’s friends feel? (proud of Turtle, happy Rabbit didn’t win, thrilled that Turtle won) What is your evidence? (they pick Turtle up and they are all smiling)

Infer: Read what the Rabbit says:”If you nap, you cannot win.” Why do you think the author had Rabbit say this? (Rabbit realizes he made a mistake to stop, rest, and nap.)

Activity 6 Retell the Events in the Book

Teacher models and students practice a retell of story according to story grammar at the action-sequence stage of story narrative development (set-up of story, events in sequence, infer characters’ feelings).


Directions:

Model a retell of the story: Use the sequence words (first, next, then, after that, finally) and connecting words (but, so, because) when you retell the story.

Students can help the teacher re tell parts of the story or fill in words when the teacher pauses. Use mental verbs (e.g., decides, realizes,  or wants) to model how to tell what you infer the character is thinking. The academic language words are bolded in the model retell.


Retell the story:

One day Turtle and Rabbit decide to have a race.  Rabbit brags that he will win. First, Fox says,” 1,2,3,GO!”. Next, Rabbit hops ahead of Turtle. Then, Rabbit decides to stop and nap under a tree because he is so far ahead of  Turtle. But while Rabbit naps, Turtle passes right by him.  Finally, Rabbit wakes up, but it is too late for him to win because Turtle is crossing the finish line. All the animals are thrilled that Turtle won, because they didn’t like when Rabbit bragged. Turtle feels so proud, and Rabbit realizes that if you nap, you cannot win the race.


Students can practice retelling parts of the story.  The teacher has the sequence words (first, next, then, after that, finally) and connecting words on cards (but, so, because). Use the pictures from the story to help students remember details of the story to retell.

Activity 7 Cut-Up Sentences

Before doing this activity become familiar with the demonstration and explanation for the Cut-up Sentences activity.


Directions: Prepare the sentences on a strip of paper and then cut the sentence into individual words, but leave the period with the last word of the sentence as a clue.  It is helpful to write each sentence in a different color or on a different color paper so students don’t mix up the words from different sentences.

Guide students to use strategies to put the words back in order to make sense. The first clues students can learn to use are: 1) an uppercase letter can signal the first word in the sentence 2) the punctuation (e.g., period, exclamation mark) at the end of the sentence (use examples) 3)letter-sound knowledge, and 4) use of sentence structure clues.

  • Turtle will not pass me.
  • “If you nap, you cannot win,” says Rabbit.
  • Rabbit tells Turtle, “You will see. I will win.”
  • Rabbit naps and Turtle jogs by him.
  • Rabbit hops and Turtle jogs.
  • Turtle wins.
  • Rabbit gets up.

Activity 9 Draw and Write

It is fine for students at this stage of development  to draw their response to the story and try to spell some of the words they want to say about their picture. It is better for them to try to spell words by sounding out the word and using their letter-sound knowledge than just copying from the book.

Have the students draw a picture of one of the animal characters with a speech bubble that says something the animal might say. It can be an example from the book, or they can be creative. Suggest they write what the character is doing and thinking at the time of the action or event.

Example:

Draw a picture of a Turtle with a speech bubble: “I  win!”

Write: Turtle is happy because he won the race.


*Note: Students can use the letter-sounds they know to write words.  For example a student may not be able to write the word “race.” They may spell is as “ras.”  This is called ‘invented spelling’ and it allows students to write words beyond their spelling knowledge. Below is an example of an invented spelling sentence by a student in the partial alphabetic stage of reading:

“Turtle is hpe becz he wun the ras.” (Turtle is happy because he won the race.)

Activity 10 Practice Reading or Sorting Words with Short Vowels.

  • Have students practice reading the words in the short vowel chart at the end of the book.
  • Write the words on cards and have students sort the words by their short vowel sound.

Activity 1 Word Sort by Vowel Pattern

Purpose: This activity prepares students to read words in the text by themselves.

 

Prepare:

  1. Write each word on a card.
  2. Make a place for students to sort the words using the headers in the chart below.
  3. Divide the multisyllabic words (two+ syllabic words) into individual syllables and underline the syllable that fits the pattern.

 

Directions:

  1. Show students a word card.
  2. Identify the syllable pattern (Open, Closed, Magic e, Vowel digraph team, R-controlled, Diphthong vowel team, C+le).  
  3. Model how to pronounce the words according to the vowel syllable pattern.
  4. Place the card under the correct vowel syllable pattern header.
  5. Have students read all the words in the same column each time a new word is added.
  6. The verb inflectional endings (-s, -ed) are removed from words so students can first learn to read the base word.  

Word Sort by Vowel Syllable Pattern

Activity 2 Phoneme-Grapheme Map

Purpose: This activity helps students to connect the sounds they hear in words with their spelling.  

  • The boxes are sound boxes and represents the number of phonemes (speech sounds) in each word, not the number of letters.   
  • Note that a vowel digraph teams uses one box for one sound. The silent e at the end of a word like stole is in the same box as the final consonant because it does not make a sound, it only influences the pronunciation of the other vowel.

Activity 3 Connecting the Spelling of the Word to its Grammatical Meaning

  • Make this chart and write and read the word sums with students.
  • Example of how to read the word sum: “c-r-ee-p plus s is rewritten as c-r-e-e-p-s.
  • Listen to how the letter s is pronounced at the end of the word.

Activity 4 Close Reading with Text-Dependent Questions

Directions: After reading the story once, use the following questions and discussion starters to guide a close re-read of the story. Ask students questions for each page to connect the text and the illustrations.  Use the ‘Note to Teacher’ for additional ideas on what students can talk about. Use think-pair-share to have students discuss their answer with a partner. Guide students to use evidence from the text and illustrations to support their answers.


Questions

Predict the characters and setting from the title and picture on the cover.

What do you think the author is trying to tell you from the title and cover illustration?

Note to Teacher

The title says, When Mom is Away the Cubs Will Play, and the picture shows three cubs inside the den. It looks like two of them are playing. One cub is looking outside the den and maybe he is watching his mom walking away.  I wonder if one cub will follow the mom.


Questions

What is important about the setting of the story?

Note to Teacher

Help students to combine information from the text and the illustrations to describe the story setup including how the characters  might feel. Help students make the connection between mom’s bushy tail and the cubs feeling snug and warm.

 

 


Questions

What is the initiating event that changes things in the red pandas’ den?

What did mom red panda tell her cubs? Why did she tell them to play safely?

What do you predict will happen?

Note to Teacher

Help students to identify that when the mom leaves that changes things and is likely the initiating event .

Ask students to read the part that tells mom red panda’s warning to her cubs. Lead them to think about mom’s feeling  (e.g., worried).

Ask students to predict what might happen. Have students give evidence for their predictions.


Questions

Where is mom red panda going?

Read the part that describes what is in the nest.

Why does the author use the word “creep”?

Note to Teacher

Guide students to recognize the word choice of the author  creeps up). Help students see the nuance of meaning for using this verb.


Questions

What happens back at the den?

What did the cubs forget?

Note to Teacher

Continue to guide students to recognize the word choice of the author  (tumble,dive, rumble). Help students see the nuance of meaning for using these verbs.

 


Questions

How do the two cubs feel?

Note to Teacher

Help students to connect the illustration to the words that describe the cubs’ expressions.

Guide students to understand the author’s word choice of “sail” as a way to describe moving.

 


Questions

What happens to the cub that fell?

How do you think the cub who fell feels?  What clues are in the illustration?

Note to Teacher

Guide students to consider the expressions in the text:

“lands with a thump”

“Lucky for her…”

“stops her fall”


Questions

What happens when mom red panda arrives back at the den?

How does the author use the word “frantic?”

What does the word, “peered” mean?

Note to Teacher

Guide students to retell this part of the story.

Discuss with students what the illustrations shows.


Questions

How does mom panda react to the situation?

How do you think she feels?

Note to Teacher

Have students retell the rescue.

 

 


Questions

How does the author end the story?

How do the cubs feel at the end?

What is mom panda thinking about? How do you know?

Note to Teacher

Help students to infer what mom panda wants to teach her cubs.

 


Questions

What do you think the illustration tells us?

What did mom panda have to teacher her cubs?

Note to Teacher

Guide students to interpret the illustration by thinking about what happened on the previous page.

 


Questions

Use the vowel pattern chart for word fluency practice.

Note to Teacher

Provide students with practice reading words sorted by vowel pattern.  This will help build student’s ability to recognize the words by sight (automatically).

Activity 5 Summary Strategy to Summarize the Story Setup

Purpose: Use this chart to help your students summarize what is important about the story setup.

Activity 6 Summary Strategy to Get at the Central Message of the Story

Purpose: Use this chart to help your students recall and organize their story summary to get at the story message.

Activity 7 Prepare Students to Use Past Tense in Their Story Recount

Purpose: Help students recount the story using the verbs in the past tense. Notice the pronunciation of the past tense –ed inflection to form the  past tense verb. Practice using the verbs by talking about the story (e.g., The animals wished they could cool off  in the mudhole.)

*Irregular past tense verbs: wake -> woke, leave -> left, creep -> crept, forget -> forgot, fall -> fell, feel -> felt

Activity 8 Model Recount of the Story

Purpose: Students can practice using sequence words ( next, then, after that, finally) connecting words (but, so, because, when, meanwhile), feeling words (e.g., disappointed, worried) , and mental verbs (wished, decided, wanted, realized) to retell or recount the story. They can use the past tense of the verbs to recount the story. At the end of their recount,  they should mention the story message.


One day three red panda cubs were curled up in their mom’s bushy tail. They were snug and warm in their den.   When they woke up they were hungry so mom panda decided to go get them food to eat.  Then, she told them to play safely while she was gone and she would bring them back a treat to eat. But as soon as she left, the cubs rumbled and tumbled. Sister cub leaned too far out of the hole to the den and fell down, down, down.  Lucky for her, she landed on a tree branch below. Meanwhile, mom red panda crept up to a nest and stole an egg for her cubs.  When mom red panda arrived home she saw two of her cubs peering out of the den.  Next,  she heard the frantic call for help from her third cub.  She raced down the tree trunk and rescued her cub. Finally, they all ate the yummy egg mom stole from the nest.  After that, mom red panda realized she had to teach her cubs more about taking care of themselves.

Activity 9 Writing Activity

On the last page there is only an illustration to allow students the opportunity to infer what mom red panda was teaching her cubs. Have students work with a partner or independently to write the text for the last page.  


Here are some examples of what a students might write.

Activity 1 Learning to Make the Sounds /m/ and /n/

Refer to the Word Scientists website before starting the lesson to learn how to teach /m/ and /n/ sounds:


Letter Mm

What do you feel? What do you see?

  • Make the /m/ sound.
  • Ask students to repeat the sound after you: /mmm/
  • Ask students: what do you feel?
  • Think-aloud: I feel my lips are together, and I  wonder how is the sound coming out. I feel a vibration if I place my finger on the side of my nose.  Put your finger along the side of your nose and say the sound/m/ for a long time. Do you feel the vibration? The sound comes out of your nose.
  • Ask students: What do you see?
  • Think-aloud: I see my lips together. To make the sound /m/, we put our lips together and hum.
  • Ask students: If you hold your three fingers on your neck when you make the sound /m/, do you feel a vibration? (yes) Cover your ears and listen. Is it a noisy or quiet sound? (noisy)
  • Ask students: Do you stretch the sound /mmm/? Or do you bounce it?
  • Think-aloud:  You stretch the sound /m/. I can make the sound until I run out of air.
  • Assign a corresponding hand motion: Tell students, “The sound /m/ is the sound I make when something tastes delicious. It begins the word monkey.   Use a motion of rubbing your tummy to show that you are eating something that tastes good. Have students repeat the sound and the motion.  The sound /mmm/ starts the words monkey and mouse.

Letter Nn

What do you feel? What do you see?

  • Make the /n/ sound.
  • Ask students to repeat the sound after you: /nnn/
  • Ask students: What do you feel?
  • Think-aloud: I feel my lips open, and the tip of my tongue behind my top teeth. I  feel a vibration in my nose. Put your finger along the side of your nose and say the sound /n/ for a long time.
  • Ask students: If you hold three fingers to your neck when you make the sound /n/, do you feel a vibration? (yes) Cover your ears and listen? Is it a noisy or quiet sound? (noisy)
  • Ask students: What do you see?
  • Think-aloud:  I see lips open, and the tip of my tongue reaching up behind my top teeth
  • Ask students: Do you stretch the sound /n/? Or do you bounce it?
  • Think-aloud: You stretch the sound /nnnn/. I can make the sound until I run out of breath.
  • Assign a corresponding hand motion: Tell students, “The sound /n/ begins the word nose ” Make motion of touching your nose . Have students repeat the sound, the keyword (nose), and the motion.

Activity 2 Exploring the Illustrations on the Book Cover

Before reading the text on each page, guide students in exploring the cover and illustrations.

Examine the cover. Tell students:

 

  • Let’s look at the cover of the book.
  • Do you recognize the character on the front cover of the book? Who is that? (It is hard to tell, but maybe it is Kim.)
  • What is Kim doing? (She is taking a photo of a monkey who is cracking open nuts to eat.)
  • What else do you see on the cover? (a monkey)
  • What sound does monkey start with? /mmm/
  • What letter spells the sound /m/? (the letter m)
  • I also see a pile of nuts.
  • I feel the sound /n/ at the beginning of the word nut.
  • What letter does nut start with? (n)
  • What sound does the letter n make? /n/)
  • The title says: Kim Finds M and N Words
  • What kind of book do you think this is? Is it a story book, a science book, or an alphabet book? (An alphabet book.)

Activity 3 Phonological Awareness

Use the pictures on page 2 of the book to practice phonological awareness activities.

  • Name each picture with students. Confirm that it is the correct label by examining the first letter in each word and checking its sound.

For each picture, ask students, “What do you see?” Students should name the picture. If they do not know a word, take time to teach it. Example: If students  labels a picture “ rug” instead of “mat” you can say, “Yes, it’s looks like a rug, but rug begins with /r/ and this word begins with the letter m and the sound /m/.  It is a mat and you can wipe your feet on the mat. I know it says mat  because I feel a /m/ sound at the beginning of the word.  So, this picture shows a mat. Repeat after me: “mat.”

  • Say, clap, and count the number of syllables in each word: map(1), nuts (1), newt (1), numbers (2), mouse (1), mat (1), nest, (1), monkey (2)
  • Onset-rime practice: Tell students you are going to play a game where you will say a word in parts and they need to guess the word.  Let students see the pictures to give them the context. m-ap (map), n-est (nest), m-ouse (mouse), n-uts (nuts), n-ewt (newt).

            Note: Use only one syllable words for the onset-rime activity.

Activity 4 Teach the Carrier Phrase

Practice using the articles a and some.

  • Prepare cut-outs of the pictures on page 2. Change the pictures so each time students read the phrase with a different picture.
  • Write the carrier phrases on the board: a _________________(one thing), some __________(more than one thing)
  • Identify a picture out loud and ask students to repeat it.
  • Fill in the blank with a word the picture.  Example: a monkey.
  • Ask students to repeat the completed phrase.

Some  __________. (more than one thing )

  • Write the carrier phrase on the board: some _____________.
  • Read the word aloud and ask students to repeat it.
  • Fill in the blank with a plural word students know. Example: some nuts.
  • Point to the picture of nuts and repeat the phrase: some nuts
  • Ask students to repeat the sentence.
  • Ask students: What is the difference between this and the previous example? (In this example, there is more than one nut.)
  • Repeat with the picture of numbers. (Tell students to listen for the plural sound at the end of the word numbers).
  • Say: We use the word some, when there is more than one thing or if something like rice cannot be divided into one thing. Say: “some numbers” “some rice”

Practice using the word “and” to tell more than one thing.

_____ and ______

  • Write the carrier phrase on the board: ________ and ________
  • Fill in the two blanks with two different things from the pictures .  Example: monkey and nuts.
  • Ask students to repeat the phrase.
  • Ask students to think of two things that go together.  Example: A monkey can crack open and eat nuts.

Practice the carrier phrase:  

  • Hold up a single item.
  • Ask students: What is this? (a ________.)
  • Hold up two or more items.
  • Ask students: What are these? (some  _______.)
  • Correct errors and practice a few times until most students are correctly identifying singular and plural nouns.
  • Draw a picture on the board of 1 nest and write: nest
  • Draw a picture of  2 nests and write: nests
  • Repeat the activity with the some of the pictures on page 2.

Activity 5 Guided Reading of the Book

After the students have mastered the carrier phrase, guide them in reading each page together as a class. Use the example below as a model for guiding students to read the book  page by page.


Example: Page 3 Text: a monkey

Tell students:

  • Let’s read the part of the sentence we know together:  a______.
  • What do you see in the picture? (a monkey)
  • What sound does monkey begin with? (/m/). How do we spell the sound /m/? (letter m)
  • Let’s clap to see how many syllables(parts) are in the word monkey  (2). So monkey is a two-syllable word that begins with the letter m.  Do you see a word that could be monkey? (the last word). That makes sense with the picture.
  • Read the sentence with me.
  • Now read the sentence to me.

Repeat this pattern for each page. Pay careful attention to page with a plural noun.  Guide students to recognize the change in the carrier phrase (a or some)


Think Aloud to confirm a word prediction based on the first letter of the word. Example on page 6:  If students were to predict that the text says, “a rug” instead of “a mat” then guide them to confirm their prediction with the first letter of the word.  Say: Since the word rug begins with the sound /r/ and the word on the page begins with the letter m, it cannot be a rug.  This is how we use our letter-sound knowledge to confirm what a word says.


Expand students vocabulary: Ask students questions about the topic on each page of the book to give additional oral language practice.   For example: What is the mouse doing? (The mouse is climbing up a bamboo shoot.)

Activity 6 Reread the text for fluency. My turn, Your Turn.

The teacher reads a page of text, and then the students read the same text. Reread the whole book. Observe students to see if they are pointing to the words as they say them (speech-to-print match).

Activity 7 Partner Reading

Break students into pairs. Make sure each pair has a copy of the book. Instruct students to read the whole book with their partner. First, Student #1 should read each page of the book, pointing to each word as he/she reads it. Next, Student #2 should reach each page of the book, pointing to each word as he/she reads it. Encourage students to help each other if they cannot recognize a word. Walk around the room and check the progress of each student, correcting errors as necessary.

Activity 8 Word Sort

Preparation: Before the lesson, cut out the pictures provided on the final page of the book of each of the words from the text.

Ask each pair of students to turn to the page of the book which shows a T-chart with columns for the letters Mm and Nn.  Give each pair of students a set of the pictures.

Instruct the pairs to sort the pictures into the correct columns, based on their starting sounds.


Model the activity:

  • Draw a larger version of the T-chart on the board.
  • Hold up a picture of a mouse.
  • Ask students: What is this? (a mouse)
  • Ask students: What is the first sound you hear? (/m/)
  • Make the corresponding hand motion that goes with the sound /m/ (rub your tummy).
  • Ask students: What letter makes the sound /m/?(m)
  • Use tape to place the picture of the mouse  into the Mm column.
  • Say:  Mouse begins with the sound /m/.
  • Repeat this procedure to sort the words that begin with either the sound /m/  or /n/.
  • Have students name all the pictures in a column each time a new picture is added.

Students work in pairs to complete their own charts. Walk around the room checking progress and correcting errors as necessary.


Group check:

  • Get the students’ attention. Ask them to stop working on their charts.
  • Hold up each picture one by one and ask students the same questions as in the model.
    • What is this?
    • What is the first sound you hear? [make the corresponding motion]
    • What letter makes that sound?
    • Use tape to place the picture in the correct column on the board.
  • Ask each student and their partner to check that they put their pictures in the correct columns.

Another Way to Do The Chart: PICTURE SORT- SOUND ONLY

Paste a word that begins with the letter m over the letter m on the chart.  Then paste a word that begins with the letter n over the letter n on the chart.  One by one, compare each of the other pictures first with the picture that begins with m and then with the picture that begins with n in the headers.  For example say:

mouse -monkey  mouse -nest, mouse sounds like monkey. They begin with the same sound, so I am going to put it in the monkey column.  Each time a student places a new picture in a column have them name all the pictures in the column.

Activity 9 Vocabulary Builder Activity

I Spy….


Explain the rules of the game: I will think of something in the room that starts with the sound /m/ or /n/. I will say, “I spy with my little eye something that starts with the sound /m/.” Use the pictures from the book and add pictures or objects of things that start with either the /m/ or /n/ sound.


Model the activity: Decide on one of the pictures or objects that starts with an /m/or /n/.

Example: nest Say: I spy with my little eye something that starts with the sound /n/ and birds lay eggs in it.  If students guess the wrong word, but it begins with the right sound say something like, “Yes this picture begins with the sound /n/ but I am thinking of a place where birds lay their eggs.”  If students give the correct answer, then provide them with feedback also, “ Yes the word  nest begins with the sound /n/ and it is a place that birds lay their eggs.”

Continue the activity until you have practiced both m and n words.

Activity 10 Assessment

  • Observe speech-to print-match. Watch each student read the book and point. Observe if they are pointing to each word as they say it.
  • Check to see if students can read the high-frequency words out of the text: a, some
  • Ask students to tell the beginning sound in the words: (map/m/, numbers/n/, nuts /n/, mat/m/,  monkey /m/, nest /n/, mouse/m/, newt /n/.

Activity 1 Learning to Make the Sounds /f/ and /v/

Refer to the Word Scientists website before starting the lesson to learn how to teach sound-symbol correspondences for /f/ and /v/ sounds.


Letter F

What do you feel? What do you see?

  • Make the /f/ sound.
  • Ask students to repeat the sound after you: /f/
  • Ask students: what do you feel?
  • Think-aloud: I feel my top teeth on my lower lip. If I hold my hand in front of my mouth, I can feel a stream of air.
  • Ask students: What do you see?
  • Think-aloud: I see my top front teeth on my bottom lip.
  • Ask students: If you hold your fingers on your neck when you make the sound /f/, do you feel a vibration? (no) So it is a quiet sound.  If you cover your ears, do you hear a quiet or noisy sound? (quiet). So it is a quiet sound.
  • Ask students: Do you stretch the sound /fffff/? Or do you bounce it?
  • Think-aloud:  You stretch the sound /f/. I can make the sound until I run out of air.
  • Assign a corresponding hand motion: Tell students, “The sound /f/ begins the word fish  so I flap my hands up and down like a fish flapping its fins.” Make a hand motion like a fish flapping its fins.  Have students repeat the sound, the key word (fish) and the motion.

Letter V

What do you feel? What do you see?

  • Make the /v/ sound.
  • Ask students to repeat the sound after you: /v/
  • Ask students: What do you feel?
  • Think-aloud: I feel my top teeth on my lower lip. If I hold my hand in front of my mouth, I can feel a vibrating stream of air. It tickles a little bit.
  • Ask students: If you hold your fingers on your neck when you make the sound /v/, do you feel a vibration? (yes) So it is a noisy sound.   If you cover your ears, do you hear a quiet or noisy sound? (noisy). So it is a noisy sound.
  • Ask students: What do you see?
  • Think-aloud: I see my top front teeth on my bottom lip.
  • Ask students: Do you stretch the sound /v/? Or do you bounce it?
  • Think-aloud: You stretch the sound / vvvvv/. I can only make the sound until I run out of breath.
  • Assign a corresponding hand motion: Tell students, “The sound /v/ begins the word violin ” Make motion of playing a violin with a bow.  Have students repeat the sound, the keyword (violin), and the motion.

Activity 2 Exploring the Illustrations on the Book Cover

Before reading the text on each page, guide students in exploring the cover and illustrations.

Examine the cover. Tell students:

  • Let’s look at the cover of the book.
  • Do you recognize the character on the front cover of the book? Who is it? (Datiz)
  • What is  Datiz doing? (He is  holding a frog in one hand and a  touching a box of vegetables in the other hand. )
  • What else do you see on the cover? (a green frog)
  • What letter does frog  start with? (f)
  • What sound does the letter f make? (/f/)
  • I also see vegetables.
  • I feel the sound /v/ at the beginning of the word  vegetables.
  • What letter does vegetables start with? (v)
  • What sound does the letter v make? (/v/)
  • The title says: Datiz Finds Vivid F and V Words
  • What does the word  “vivid” mean? It means bright colors.
  • What do you see that has vivid, bright colors? ( frog, peppers, broccoli, squash)
  • What kind of book do you think this is? Is it a story book, a science book, or an alphabet book? (An alphabet book.)

 

Activity 3 Phonological Awareness

Use the pictures on page 2 of the book to practice phonological awareness activities.

  • Name each picture with students. Confirm that it is the correct label by examining the first letter in each word and checking its sound.

For each picture, ask students, “What do you see?” Students should name the picture. If they do not know a word, take time to teach it. Example: If students  labels a picture “ jar” instead of “vase” you can say, “Yes, it’s looks like a jar, but jar begins with /j/ and this word begins with the letter v and the sound /v/. The book we are reading is about words that begin with the letter f or v.  It is a vase and you can put flowers in a vase and add water to keep the flowers fresh.  I know it says vase because I feel a /v/ sound at the beginning of the word. So, this picture shows a vase. Repeat after me: “vase.”

  • Say, clap, and count the number of syllables in each word: fox (1), frog (1), violin (3), vegetables (4), volcano (3), vase (1), fish (1), vest, (1), forest (2)
  • Onset-rime practice: Tell students you are going to play a game where you will say a word in parts and they need to guess the word.  Let students see the pictures to give them the context. V-ase (vase), f-ox (fox),v-est (vest) f-ish (fish), fr-og (frog).

            Note: Use only one syllable words for the onset-rime activity.

Activity 4 Teach the Carrier Phrase

Practice using the articles is and some.

  • Prepare cut-outs of the pictures on page 2. Change the pictures so each time students read the phrase with a different picture.
  • Write the carrier phrases on the board:

              a _______________ (one thing) some ___________(more than one thing)

  • Identify a picture out loud and ask studentsto repeat it.
  • Fill in the blank  space with the picture. Example: a fish.
  • Have all the students repeat the completed phrase in unison.
  • Save the word “vegetables” for the carrier phrase “some __________” because it is a plural.   
  • Write the carrier phrase on the board:   Some __________. (more than one thing )
  • Read the word out loud and ask students to repeat it.
  • Fill in the blank with a plural word students know. Example: some books.
  • Hold up two or more books and repeat the phrase: some books
  • Ask students to repeat the sentence.
  • Ask students: What is the difference between this and the previous example? (In this example, there is more than one book.)
  • Repeat with the picture of vegetables. (Call attention to the plural marker s at the end of the word that tells us there is more than one vegetable.)
  • Ask students: Why is there a letter s at the end of the word vegetable? (We add an s when there is more than one of something.) Name all the vegetables in the picture.  
  • Say: We use the article some, when there is more than one thing or if something like rice cannot be divided into one thing. Say: “ some vegetables” “some rice
  • Draw a picture on the board of 1 volcano and write: volcano
  • Draw a picture of  2 volcanoes and write: volcanoes
  • Repeat the activity with the some of the other pictures on page 2.

Practice using the word “and” to tell more than one thing.

_____ and ______

  • Write the carrier phrase on the board: ________ and ________
  • Fill in the two blanks with two different things  from the pictures. Example: violin and vest
  • Ask students to repeat the phrase.

Ask students to think of two things that go together.  Example: fox and forest because foxes live in the forest.

Activity 5 Guided Reading of the Book

After the students have mastered the carrier phrase, guide them in reading each page together as a class. Use the example below as a model for guiding students to read the book page by page.


Example: Page 3 Text: a fish

Tell students:

  • Let’s read the part of the sentence we know together:  a______.
  • What do you see in the picture? (a fish)
  • What sound does fish begin with? (/f/). How do we spell the sound /f/? (letter f)
  • Let’s clap to see how many syllables are in the word fish (1). So fish is a one syllable word that begins with the letter f. Do you see a word that could be fish? (the last word). That makes sense with the picture.
  • Read the page with me.
  • Now read the page to me.

Repeat this pattern for each page. Pay careful attention to pages with a plural noun.  Guide students to recognize the change in the carrier phrase (a or some)


Expand students vocabulary: Ask students questions about the topic on each page of the book to give additional oral language practice.   For example: Where do fish live? (Fish live in the sea.) What does a fox look like? (It is furry and has pointy ears and a bushy tail.) Name all the vegetables you see (pepper, squash, broccoli).

Activity 6 Reread the text for fluency. My turn, Your Turn.

The teacher reads a page of text, and then the students read the same text. Reread the whole book. Observe students to see if they are pointing to the words as they say them (speech-to-print match).

Activity 7 Partner Reading

Break students into pairs. Make sure each pair of students has a copy of the book. Instruct students to read the whole book with their partner.  First, Student #1 should read each page of the book, pointing to each word as he/she reads it. Next, Student #2 should reach each page of the book, pointing to each word as he/she reads it. Encourage students to help each other if they cannot recognize a word. Walk around the room and check the progress of each student, correcting errors as necessary.

Activity 8 Word Sort

Preparation: Before the lesson, cut out the vocabulary pictures provided on the page before the sorting chart.


Ask each pair of students to turn to the page of the book which shows a T-chart with columns for the letters Ff and Vv. Give each pair of students a set of the pictures.


Instruct the pairs to sort the pictures into the correct columns, based on their starting sounds.


Model the activity:

  • Draw a larger version of the T-chart on the board.
  • Hold up a picture of a fish
  • Ask students: What is this? (a fish)
  • Ask students: What is the first sound you hear? (/f/)
  • Make the corresponding fish flapping its fins motion that goes with the sound /f/.
  • Ask students: What letter makes the sound /f/? (f)
  • Use tape to place the picture of the fish into the Ff column.
  • Say:  fish begins with the sound /f/.
  • Repeat this procedure to sort the words that begin with the sound /f/ or /v/.
  • Have students name all the pictures in a column each time a new picture is added.

Students work in pairs to complete their own charts. Walk around the room checking progress and correcting errors as necessary.


Group check:

  • Get the students’ attention. Ask them to stop working on their charts.
  • Hold up each picture one by one and ask students the same questions as in the model.
    • What is this?
    • What is the first sound you hear? [make the corresponding motion]
    • What letter makes that sound?
    • Use tape to place the picture in the correct column on the board.
  • Ask partners to check that they put their pictures in the correct columns.

Another Way to Do The Chart: PICTURE SORT- SOUND ONLY

Paste a word that begins with the letter F over the printed letter on the chart.  Then paste a word that begins with the sound /v /over the letter V on the chart.  One by one compare each of the other pictures first with the picture headers that begins with f and then with the picture header  that begins with v.  For example say: vest-fish, vest -violin . Vest sounds like violin . They begin with the same sound, so I am going to put it in the violin column.  Each time a student places a new picture in a column have them name all the pictures in the column.

Activity 9 Vocabulary Builder Activity

I Spy….


Explain the rules of the game: I will think of something from this group of pictures that starts with the sound /v/ or /f/. I will say, “I spy with my little eye something that starts with the sound /v/.”  You can guess what thing I am thinking about. Use the pictures from the book and add pictures or objects of things that start with either the /f/ or /v/ sound.


Model the activity: Decide on one of the pictures or objects that starts with an /f /or /v/.

Example: forest Say: I spy with my little eye something that starts with the sound /f/ and it is a forest animal. If students guess the wrong word, but it begins with the right sound say something like, “Yes this picture begins with the sound /f/ but I am thinking of an animal that lives in the  forest.”

Continue the activity until you have practiced all the  f and v words.

Activity 10 Assessment

  • Observespeech-to print-match. Watch each student read the book and point. Observe if they are pointing to each word as they say it.
  • Check to see if students can read the high-frequency words  out of the text: a, some
  • Ask students to tell the beginning sound in the words: fish /f/, forest /f/, frog /f/,fox /f/,  violin /v/, vase /v/, volcano /v/, vest /v/.

Activity 1 Learning to Make the Sounds /h/ and /w/

Refer to the Word Scientists website before starting the lesson to learn how to teach /h/ and /w/ sounds:


Letter Hh

What do you feel? What do you see?

  • Make the /h/ sound.
  • Ask students to repeat the sound after you: /h/
  • Ask students: what do you feel?
  • Think-aloud: I feel my mouth open, and I feel hot air coming out if I put my hand up to my mouth and say /h/-/h/-/h/. The air just blows out of my mouth.
  • Ask students: What do you see?
  • Think-aloud: I see my lips apart:. To make the sound /h/, we open our lips and push out air.
  • Ask students: If you hold your three fingers on your neck when you make the sound /h/, do you feel a vibration? (no) Cover your ears and listen Is it a noisy or quiet sound? (quiet)
  • Ask students: Do you stretch the sound /h/? Or do you bounce it?
  • Think-aloud:  You can stretch the sound /h/, but is is better to bounce it so you can hear the sound again and again /h/-/h/-/h/.
  • Assign a corresponding hand motion: Tell students, “The sound /h/ is the sound a dog makes when it is panting /h/-/h/-/h/.  Use a motion of holding your hands up as if they were paws and open your mouth with your tongue hanging down to show w that you are panting like a dog, try to use just a voiceless /h/,/h//h/. Have students repeat the sound and the motion.  The sound /h/ starts the words hat, and heart..

Letter Ww

What do you feel? What do you see?

  • Make the /w/ sound.
  • Ask students to repeat the sound after you: /w/
  • Ask students: What do you feel?
  • Think-aloud: I feel my lips closed and puckered up, and as I whisper the sound my lips change from rounded to a bit of a smile. I don’t feel a lot of air, like with the /h/ sound.  
  • Ask students: If you hold three fingers to your neck when you make the sound /w/, do you feel a vibration? (no) Cover your ears and listen? Is it a noisy or quiet sound? (quiet) (Be careful not to add a vowel sound).
  • Ask students: What do you see?
  • Think-aloud:  I see lips lips puckered like for a kiss. And then I pull my lips back.to a  little smile.
  • Ask students: Do you stretch the sound /w/? Or do you bounce it?
  • Think-aloud: You bounce the sound /w/-/w/-/w/. Assign a corresponding hand motion: Tell students, “The sound /w/ begins the word wag, like when a dog wags its tail. ” Make motion of wagging with your finger . Have students repeat the sound and the motion.

Activity 2 Exploring the Illustrations on the Book Cover

Before reading the text on each page, guide students in exploring the cover and illustrations.


Examine the cover. Tell students:

  • Let’s look at the cover of the book.
  • Can you see the character on the cover? Who is that? (It’s Tim and his name is in the title of the book.)
  • What is Tim doing? (He is riding on a horse near a beautiful lake. .)
  • What else do you see on the cover? (a field of flowers, a sky filled with clouds)
  • What sound does horse  start with? /h/
  • What letter spells the sound /h/? (the letter h)
  • I also see water.
  • I feel the sound /w/ at the beginning of the word water.
  • What letter does water start with? (w)
  • What sound does the letter w make? /w/)
  • The title says: tim Finds H and W Words
  • What kind of book do you think this is? Is it a story book, a science book, or an alphabet book? (An alphabet book.)

Activity 3 Phonological Awareness

Use the pictures on page 2 of the book to practice phonological awareness activities.

  • Name each picture with students. Confirm that it is the correct label by examining the first letter in each word and checking its sound.

For each picture, ask students, “What do you see?” Students should name the picture. If they do not know a word, take time to teach it. Example: If students  labels a picture “ leaf” instead of “web” you can say, “Yes, there is a leaf, but leaf begins with /l/ and this word begins with the letter w and the sound /w/. The book we are reading is about words that begin with the letter h or w.  It is a web and I see a spider.  Spiders can spin a web. I know it says web because I feel a /w/ sound at the beginning of the word. So, this picture shows a web. Repeat after me: “web.”

  • Say, clap, and count the number of syllables in each word: hat(1), worm (1),  window (2), horse (1), heart (1), web (1), watermelon (4), hippopotamus, (5), well (1)
  • Onset-rime practice: Tell students you are going to play a game where you will say a word in parts and they need to guess the word.  Let students see the pictures to give them the context. w-ell (well),h-orse(horse),w-eb (web) h-art (heart), h-at (hat), h-og (hog).

Note: Use only one syllable words for the onset-rime activity.

Activity 4 Teach the Carrier Phrase

Practice using the phrases I see a ______.  I see some ________.


a _______________ (one thing)

  • Prepare cut-outs of the pictures on page 2. Change the pictures so each time students read the phrase with a different picture.
  • Write the carrier phrases on the board:

I see a _______________ .(one thing) I see some ___________.(more than one thing)

  • Identify a picture out loud and ask students to repeat it.
  • Fill in the blank  space with the picture. Example: I see a horse.

Activity 5 Guided Reading of the Book

After the students have mastered the carrier phrase, guide them in reading each page together as a class. Use the example below as a model for guiding students to read the book  page by page.


Example: Page 3 Text: I see a hippopotamus.

Tell students:

  • Let’s read the part of the sentence we know together: I see  a______.
  • What do you see in the picture? (a hippo or hippopotamus)
  • What sound does hippopotamus begin with? (/h/). How do we spell the sound /h/? (letter h)
  • Let’s clap to see how many syllables(parts) are in the word hippopotamus  (5). WOW! Hippopotamus is a really long word.  It has 5 syllables. Do you see a word that could be hippopotamus? (the last word). That makes sense with the picture. Let’s practice saying this word.  Sometimes people call this animal a hippo because the whole word is so long.
  • Read the sentence with me.
  • Now read the sentence to me.

Repeat this pattern for each page. Pay careful attention to pages with a plural noun.  Guide students to recognize the change in the carrier phrase (I see some…)

Think-aloud to confirm a word prediction based on the first letter of the word. Example on page 6:  If students were to predict that the text says, “a leaf” instead of “a web” then guide them to confirm their prediction with the first letter of the word.  Say: Since the word leaf begins with the sound /l/ and the word on the page begins with the letter w, it cannot be a leaf.  This is how we use our letter-sound knowledge to confirm what a word says.

Expand students vocabulary: Ask students questions about the topic on each page of the book to give additional oral language practice.   For example: What is the hippopotamus doing? (The hippopotamus is grazing in the grass.)

Activity 6 Reread the text for fluency. My turn, Your Turn.

The teacher reads a page of text, and then the students read the same text. Reread the whole book. Observe students to see if they are pointing to the words as they say them (speech-to print-match).

Activity 7 Partner Reading

Break students into pairs. Make sure each pair has a copy of the book. Instruct students to read the whole book with their partner. First, Student #1 should read each page of the book, pointing to each word as he/she reads it. Next, Student #2 should reach each page of the book, pointing to each word as he/she reads it. Encourage students to help each other if they cannot recognize a word. Walk around the room and check the progress of each student, correcting errors as necessary.

Activity 8 Word Sort

Preparation: Before the lesson, cut out the pictures provided on the final page of the book of each of the words from the text.

Ask each pair of students to turn to the page of the book which shows a T-chart with columns for the letters Hh and Ww.  Give each pair of students  a set of the pictures.

Instruct the pairs to sort the pictures into the correct columns, based on their starting sounds.


Model the activity:

  • Draw a larger version of the T-chart on the board.
  • Hold up a picture of a mouse.
  • Ask students: What is this? (a hat)
  • Ask students: What is the first sound you hear? (/h/)
  • Make the corresponding hand motion that goes with the sound /h/ (hold your sides and laugh).
  • Ask students: What letter makes the sound /h/?(h)
  • Use tape to place the picture of the hats  into the Hh column.
  • Say:  Hats  begins with the sound /h/.
  • Repeat this procedure to sort the words that begin with either the sound /h/  or /w/.
  • Have students name all the pictures in a column each time a new picture is added.

Students work in pairs to complete their own charts. Walk around the room checking progress and correcting errors as necessary.


Group check:

  • Get the students’ attention. Ask them to stop working on their charts.
  • Hold up each picture one by one and ask students the same questions as in the model.
    • What is this?
    • What is the first sound you hear? [make the corresponding motion]
    • What letter makes that sound?
    • Use tape to place the picture in the correct column on the board.
  • Ask each student and their partner to check that they put their pictures in the correct columns.

Another Way to Do The Chart: PICTURE SORT- SOUND ONLY

Paste a word that begins with the letter h over the letter h  Then paste a word that begins with the letter w over the letter w  One by one  compare each of the other pictures first with the  picture that begins with h and then with the picture that begins with w in the headers.  For example say:

hogs-hats, hogs -web, hogs sounds like hats so I am going to put it in the hats column.  Each time a student places a new picture in a column have them name all the pictures in the column.

Activity 9 Vocabulary Builder Activity

I Spy….


Explain the rules of the game: I will think of something in the room that starts with the sound /h/ or /w/. I will say, “I spy with my little eye something that starts with the sound /h/.” Use the pictures from the book and add pictures or objects of things that start with either the /h/ or /w/ sound.


Model the activity: Decide on one of the pictures or objects that starts with an /h/or /w/.

Example: well Say: I spy with my little eye something that starts with the sound /w/ and we get water from it.  If students guess the wrong word, but it begins with the right sound say something like, “Yes this picture begins with the sound /nw/ but I am thinking of a place where we get water.”  If students give the correct answer, then provide them with feedback also, “ Yes a well begins with the sound /w/ and it is place that we get water.”


Continue the activity a few times until you have practiced both h  and w  words.

Activity 10 Assessment

  • Observe speech-to print-match. Watch each student read the book and point. Observe if they are pointing to each word as they say it.
  • Check to see if students can read the high-frequency words out of the text: a, some
  • Ask students to tell the beginning sound in the words: (heart/h/, horse/h/,watermelon /w/, web/w/, hats /h/, worm /w/, window/w/, hippopotamus /h/.

Activity 1 Learning to Make the Sounds /k/ and /g/

Refer to the Word Scientists website before starting the lesson to learn how to teach sound symbol correspondences for /k/ and /g/ sounds.


Letter K

What do you feel? What do you see?

  • Make the /k/ sound.
  • Ask students to repeat the sound after you: /k/
  • Ask students: What do you feel?
  • Think-aloud: I feel my tongue tip touching behind my bottom teeth, but the rest of my tongue is pulled way back in my mouth. If I hold my hand in front of my mouth, I can feel a puff  of air when I make the sound.
  • Ask students: What do you see?
  • Think-aloud: I see my mouth is open a bit, but my tongue is pulled way back in my mouth.
  • Ask students: If you hold your fingers on your neck when you make the sound /k/, do you feel a vibration? (no) So it is a quiet sound.  If you cover your ears, do you hear a quiet or noisy sound? (quiet). So it is a quiet sound.
  • Ask students: Do you stretch the sound /k/? Or do you bounce it?
  • Think-aloud:  You bounce the sound /k/-/k/-/k/ because you cannot stretch it.
  • Assign a corresponding hand motion: Tell students, “The sound /k/ begins the word key so I make the hand motion of turning a key in a lock.  Make a hand motion like a turning a key. Have students repeat the sound /k/, the key word (key) and the motion.

Letter G

What do you feel? What do you see?

  • Make the /g/ sound.
  • Ask students to repeat the sound after you: /g/
  • Ask students: What do you feel?
  • Think-aloud: I feel my tongue tip touching behind my bottom teeth, but the rest of my tongue is pulled way back in my mouth.. If I hold my hand in front of my mouth.
  • Ask students: If you hold your fingers on your neck when you make the sound /g/, do you feel a vibration? (yes) So it is a noisy sound.   If you cover your ears, do you hear a quiet or noisy sound? (noisy). So it is a noisy sound.
  • Ask students: What do you see?
  • Ask students: Do you stretch the sound /g/? Or do you bounce it?
  • Think-aloud: You bounce the sound /g/-/g/-/g/ because you cannot stretch it.
  • Assign a corresponding hand motion: Tell students, “The sound /g/ begins the word “go ” Make motion of pointing and say “go.”  Have students repeat the sound /g/, the key word (go), and the motion.

Activity 2 Exploring the Illustrations on the Book Cover

Before reading the text on each page, guide students in exploring the cover and illustrations.

Examine the cover. Tell students:

  • Let’s look at the cover of the book.
  • Do you recognize the character on the front cover of the book? Who is it? (Kim)
  • What sound does the letter k make? (/k/)
  • I feel the sound /k/ at the beginning of the name Kim and the word kitten.
  • I feel the sound /g/ at the beginning of the word  gift.
  • What do you think might be in the gift box? (any answer that makes sense)
  • What kind of book do you think this is? Is it a story book, a science book, or an alphabet book? (an alphabet book)

Activity 3 Phonological Awareness

Use the pictures on page 2 of the book to practice phonological awareness activities.

  • Name each picture with students. Confirm that it is the correct label by examining the first letter in each word and checking its sound.

For each picture, ask students, “What do you see?” Students should name the picture. If they do not know a word, take time to teach it. Example: If students  labels a picture “ duck” instead of “goose” you can say, “Yes, it’s looks like a duck, but duck begins with sound /d/ and this word begins with the letter g and the sound /g/. The book we are reading is about words that begin with the letter k or g.  It is a goose and that is a bird like a duck with webbed feet that swims in the water and waddles when it walks on land.   I know it says goose because I feel a /g/ sound at the beginning of the word. So, this picture shows a  goose landing in the water. Repeat after me: “goose.”

  • Say, clap, and count the number of syllables in each word: kite (1), gate (1), kangaroo (3),  gorilla (3), kitten (2), goose (1), gift (1), Kim, (1), kettle(2)
  • Onset-rime practice: Tell students you are going to play a game where you will say a word in parts and they need to guess the word.  Let students see the pictures to give them the context. k-ite (kite), g-oose(goose),g-ift (gift) g-ate(gate)

            Note: Use only one syllable words for the onset-rime activity.

Activity 4 Teach the Carrier Phrases

Practice using the carrier sentence: This is a ______.   A ________is in a ___________.


A ________is in the___________.  

  • Prepare cut-outs of the pictures on page 2. Change the pictures so each time students read the phrase with a different picture.
  • Write the carrier phrases on the board:

This is a __________________.  A _______in a ___________.

  • Identify a picture out loud and ask students to repeat it.
  • Fill in the blank  space with the picture. Example: This is a kitten.
  • A kitten is in a garden.  A goose is in a pond.  A kite in the sky.  A gorilla in the jungle.

Categories and Attributes:

  • Name the animals on the page. (goose, kitten, gorilla, kangaroo)
  • Name something that opens and shuts. (gate, gift box)
  • Which animal has feathers and can fly? (goose)
  • Which animal jumps/hops? (kangaroo)
  • Which animal lives in the jungle? (gorilla)
  • Which animal is a baby? (kitten)

Activity 5 Guided Reading of the Book

After the students have mastered the carrier phrase, guide them in reading each page together as a class. Use the example below as a model for guiding students to read the book  page by page.


Example: Page 4 Text: This is a kettle.

Tell students:

  • Let’s read the part of the sentence we know together:  This is a ________.
  • What do you see in the picture? (a kettle)
  • What sound does kettle begin with? (/k/). How do we spell the sound /k/? (letter k)
  • Let’s clap to see how many syllables are in the word kettle (2). Kettle is a two syllable word that begins with the letter k. Do you see a word that could be kettle? (the last word). That makes sense with the picture.
  • Read the page with me.
  • Now read the page to me.

Repeat this pattern for each page.

 


Expand students vocabulary: Ask students questions about the topic on each page of the book to give additional oral language practice.   For example: Where does a gorilla live? (A gorilla lives in the jungle.) What does a kitten look like? (It is furry and has pointy ears and a long tail.)

Activity 6 Reread the text for fluency. My turn, Your Turn.

The teacher reads a page of text, and then the students read the same text. Reread the whole book. Observe students to see if they are pointing to the words as they say them (speech-to print-match).

Activity 7 Partner Reading

Break students into pairs. Make sure each pair of students has a copy of the book. Instruct students to read the whole book with their partner.  First, Student #1 should read each page of the book, pointing to each word as he/she reads it. Next, Student #2 should reach each page of the book, pointing to each word as he/she reads it. Encourage students to help each other if they cannot recognize a word. Walk around the room and check the progress of each student, correcting errors as necessary.

Activity 8 Word Sort

Preparation: Before the lesson, cut out the vocabulary pictures provided on the page before the sorting chart.


Ask each pair of students to turn to the page of the book which shows a T-chart with columns for the letters Kk and Gg. Give each pair of students a set of the pictures.


Instruct the pairs to sort the pictures into the correct columns, based on their starting sounds.


Model the activity:

  • Draw a larger version of the T-chart on the board.
  • Hold up a picture of a kitten
  • Ask students: What is this? (a kitten)
  • Ask students: What is the first sound you hear? (/k/)
  • Make the corresponding turning the key motion that goes with the letter/k/.
  • Ask students: What letter makes the sound /k/? (k)
  • Use tape to place the picture of the kitten into the Kk column.
  • Say:  kitten begins with the sound /k/.
  • Repeat this procedure to sort the words that begin with the sound /k/ or /g/.
  • Have students name all the pictures in a column each time a new picture is added.

Students work in pairs to complete their own charts. Walk around the room checking progress and correcting errors as necessary.


Group check:

  • Get the students’ attention. Ask them to stop working on their charts.
  • Hold up each picture one by one and ask students the same questions as in the model.
    • What is this?
    • What is the first sound you hear? [make the corresponding motion]
    • What letter makes that sound?
    • Use tape to place the picture in the correct column on the board.
  • Ask partners to check that they put their pictures in the correct columns.

Another Way to Do The Chart:  AUDITORY PICTURE SORT- SOUND ONLY

Paste a word that begins with the sound /k/ over the printed letter K on the chart. Then paste a word that begins with the sound /g /over the letter G on the chart.  One by one compare each of the other pictures first with the picture headers that begins with /k/and then with the picture header  that begins with /g/.  For example say: kitten-kite, kitten-gate . Kitten sounds like kIte. They begin with the same sound, so I am going to put the kitten in the same column as kite  Each time a student places a new picture in a column have them name all the pictures in the column.

Activity 9 Vocabulary Builder Activity

I Spy….


Explain the rules of the game: I will think of something from this group of pictures that starts with the sound /k/ or /g/. I will say, “I spy with my little eye something that starts with the sound /k/.”  You can guess what thing I am thinking about. Use the pictures from the book and add pictures or objects of things that start with either the /k/ or /g/ sound.


Model the activity: Decide on one of the pictures or objects that starts with an /k/or /g/.

Example: forest Say: I spy with my little eye something that starts with the sound /g/ and it is a jungle animal. If students guess the wrong word, but it begins with the right sound say something like, “Yes this picture begins with the sound /g/ but I am thinking of an animal that lives in the  jungle.”


Continue the activity until you have practiced all the  k and g words.

Activity 10 Assessment

  • Observespeech-to print-match. Watch each student read the book and point. Observe if they are pointing to each word as they say it.
  • Check to see if students can read the high-frequency words out of the text: a, this, is, in
  • Ask students to tell thebeginning sound in the words: kite /k/, gorilla /g/, kitten /k/, goose /g/,  kangaroo/k/, gate/g/, garden /g/, Kim/k/.

Activity 1 Explore the Book Cover

Page 1

Direct students’ attention to the illustration on the book cover. Lead students to infer what the book will be about. Connect the title of the book to the illustration. This will help them to try to read the words during the guided reading of the book. The lesson provides the questions you can ask students, and gives a model of what you can say to make a prediction with evidence from the title and cover illustration.


Make Predictions About the Story

  • Discuss the title and pictures.
  • What is the setting of the story? (It looks like inside of a house..)
  • Who and where are the characters? (I see a dog sleeping on a rug.)
  • What do you think  the characters will be doing? (Maybe taking a nap.)
  • What do you see in the picture that connects to the title? (I see a dog sleeping.)
  • What do you see on the back wall? (I see a big window with curtains or drapes).

Model Think-Aloud to Describe the Cover Illustrations

  • The title says, “ Who is Sleeping?” There is a question mark, so that makes me think maybe other animals will be sleeping too.
  • Say: I know the dog is sleeping because its eyes are closed and I see sleep sounds.
  • Ask: What are the sleep sounds? (zzz)
  • Say: Let’s all read the title together: Who is Sleeping?  It sounds like a question the author is asking the reader.  Have students point to each word as they read the title. (speech to print match)

Model Inferences

  • I wonder if the window is open.
  • I predict the story will be about characters who are sleeping.

Academic Language Sentence Frames

Model these academic language frames for students to use when making inferences about the cover.

Oral Language Level 1:

Ask students to point to parts of the illustration and make connections between the illustration and the words in the title. Point to and name things in the picture. For example, the dog, the rug, the window, the plant, the curtains or drapes, and the trees.

Oral Language Level 2 +:

Easy: Name the items in a sentence: I see a _________.  This is a ___________. These are ________.

(Example: I see a plant.)

Harder : I read the title _______________, so I think ________________.

(Example: I read the title “Who is sleeping?” so I think the story will have animals sleeping.

I see ____________, so I predict that __________________.

(Example: I see a dog sleeping and the window is open,  so I predict there will be other animals coming in to nap.


Character Introduction page 2
Name all the characters on page 2. (elephant, cat, mouse, dog, butterfly)

Explain what a narrator is.  (The narrator helps to tell the story.)

Ask: What do you think the other characters will do?

Say: Let’s do some word work so we can read about what happens to these animal characters.

Activity 2 Word Work | Foundational skills

Before leading students through a guided reading of the book, Who is Sleeping? prepare students to apply what they know about words, letters, and sounds to figure out what the words in the story say. This will include practice thinking about the sounds or syllables in words and using the first letter of words to predict what the word says.


Phonological Awareness Practice: Use page 2 for the following activities:

  • Name all the pictures on page 2.
  • Clap and count syllables:cat(1), mouse (1), dog (1), butterfly (3), elephant (3), narrators (3)
  • Identify the beginning sound for the words: cat/k/, dog /d/, butterfly /b/ mouse /m/.
  • Onset-rime: c-at (cat), m-ouse  (mouse), d-og (dog)

Note: For the onset-rime activity use only one syllable words

Identify How to Make the Sounds /m/, /b /, /d/, /k/

Use multisensory cues to help students learn the sounds made by the letters or other letter-sound relationships your students need to practice.

Explain to students that the letter c makes the /k/ sound in cat.

 

 


Language Practice with High-Frequency Word Practice  

Write the carrier phrase on a sentence strip and leave room to put in a picture or point to the pictures of animals from the book. Students should see the bolded words in print so they learn to read them.

Focus on words: for, a, is, I , want, to, too, says, the, oh, no

  • Practice using the phrases and have students use the pictures to complete the sentence:
  • The   ____________  (dog, elephant, cat, mouse, dog, butterfly)

          (Act out the verbs  to go with each animal).

  • Oh no, the ____________ is  _____________.

                                 (animal) (action/verb)

  • I want to ____________________. (Student says something they want to do.)
  • The dog says ___________(woof).  The cat says ___________(meow).

Activity 3 A Guided First Reading of Text

  • Teacher guides students to read each page of the text.
  • Read the predictable pattern part, and predict the new word or words on each page from the picture.
  • Confirm the new word from the first sound in the word.
  • Ask text-dependent questions about each page of text to connect the pictures with the words.  

Page 3 Text: A dog is sleeping. “I want to sleep, too!” says the cat..

Guided Group Reading:

Ask: What other character do you see in the picture?

  • Answer: I see a cat in the window. Ask: What sound does the word cat begin with? (/k/). remember the /k/ sound can be spelled with the letter c or k.  Can you find the word cat on this page?    We can confirm that we are right because it begins with the letter c and the first sound in cat is the letter c.
  • Find the word that begins with the sound /d/ for dog.
  • Let’s read the first sentence.  A dog is _______________. Ask: What is the dog doing? (sleeping)
  • Let’s read together, “A dog is sleeping. “
  • Say: In the next sentence I see quotation marks. Point to the quotations. Look at the last word, cat.  This means the cat is speaking. Let’s read what the cat says in the quotation marks. “I want to sleep, too!”
  • I will show you how we can read this with the part of a narrator and a cat.  
  • The teacher reads, “ The dog is sleeping.”
  • Tell the students to read what the cat says, “ I want to sleep too.” Leave out the part, “says the cat.”
  • Explain to students that when you are performing the book, and taking the part of a character you just read what is in quotation marks.

Page 4 Text: The cat  is sleeping. “I want to sleep, too!” says the mouse.

Guided Group Reading:

Ask: What new character do you see in the picture? (mouse)

If students say “rat” guide them to discover that the new word on the page begins with the letter m, so the word must say mouse because mouse begins with the sound /m/, spelled with an m and rat begins with the sound /r/spelled with an r.

  • Let’s read together, “A cat is sleeping. “
  • Say: In the next sentence I see quotation marks. Point to the quotations. Look at the last word, mouse.  This means the mouse is speaking. Let’s read what the mouse says in the quotation marks. “I want to sleep, too!”
  • I will show you how we can read this with the part of a narrator and a mouse.  
  • The teacher reads, “ The cat is sleeping.”
  • Tell the students to read what the mouse says, “ I want to sleep, too,”
  • Read the whole page with students, but leave out, “says the mouse.”
  • Read the sleeping sounds with students spelled, “Zzzz.”

Page 5 Text: The mouse is sleeping. “I want to sleep, too!” says the butterfly.

Guided Group Reading:

What character do you see on the window sill now? (butterfly)

  • Let’s read together, “The mouse is sleeping. “
  • Say: In the next sentence I see quotation marks. Point to the quotations. Look at the last word, butterfly.  This means the butterfly is speaking. Let’s read what the butterfly says in the quotation marks. “I want to sleep, too!”
  • I will show you how we can read this with the part of a narrator and a butterfly. 
  • The teacher reads, “ The mouse is sleeping.”
  • Tell the students to read what the butterfly says, “I want to sleep, too,” Read the whole page with students, but leave out, “says the butterfly.”.  
  • Read the sleeping sounds with students spelled, “Zzzz.”

 


Page 6 Text: The butterfly is sleeping. “I want to sleep, too!” says the elephant.

Guided Group Reading:

What  new character do you see on the window sill now? (butterfly)

  • Let’s read together, “The butterfly  is sleeping. “
  • Say: In the next sentence I see quotation marks. Point to the quotations. Look at the last word, elephant.  This means the elephant is speaking, “I want to sleep too,”
  • The teacher reads, “ The butterfly is sleeping.”
  • Tell the students to read what the elephant says, “ I want to sleep, too,” Read the whole page with students, but leave out, “says the elephant.”
  • Read the sleeping sounds with students spelled, “Zzzz.”

 

 


Page 7 Text: Oh,no! The elephant is too big!

Guided Group Reading:

Say:  What  characters do you see in the picture. (the elephant, the butterfly, the mouse, , the cat, and the dog)

  • Let’s read  the first sentence together. “Oh,no!”
  • Point out the exclamation mark (!) and model for students how to read the sentence with expression.
  • Read the first part of the second sentence with students, “The elephant is_________.”
  • Ask students: Is the elephant sleeping? (no) Why? ( He is too big.)
  • Read the sentence with me: The elephant is too big!”.   
  • Let’s read both sentences. I notice an exclamation mark at the end of the both sentences. So we have to read it louder and with expression, Oh,no! The elephant is too big!

Activity 4 Second Reading of the Book and Readers’ Theater

Readers Theater Video

There is a Readers’ Theater video presentation of this book to help students understand how to use the book in a readers’ theater format.  The puppet characters of Kim and Deepa do a think aloud toguide students in acting out the book as a play. They model how students can change their voices to represent the different characters.  The swoops under the phrases in the sentences help students to read the text the way we speak to promote speech like prosody for more fluent reading. Prosody, is the feature of expressive reading that includes timing, phrasing, emphasis, and intonation that people use when speaking to convey aspects of meaning and make their reading more engaging.  The puppets model the prosody in their presentation and the swoops provide visual clues to your students.

Reread the text for fluency.  My turn, your turn.

The teacher reads a page of text, and then the students read the same text. Reread the whole book. Observe students to see if they are pointing to the words as they say them (speech-to-print match).

Example:

Teacher: “My turn. Oh,no! The elephant is too big! Your turn.

Students: Oh,no! The elephant is too big!


Reread the text as a play (Reader’s Theater)

Have students take the part of the character on each page and the teacher read the narrator part to  in quotations.

Then switch parts.

Example:

Narrator: A dog is sleeping.

Cat: “ I want to sleep too.”

Activity 5 Third Reading of the Book With Text-Dependent Questions

Close reading of text with Text-Dependent Questions

Reread each page of text with students and ask text-dependent questions that will help students to understand the content and vocabulary of the book. Practice retelling the story as you go along. Use the sequence language cue words: first, next, then, after that, finally.

Identify the following punctuation marks on each page: period (.), exclamation mark (!) question mark (?)). Model reading  sentence according to the punctuation mark to emphasize expression.


Page 2 Text: Characters for Reader’s Theater. (Note: Students should not be expected to read this page.)
Oral language level 1:

Point to the cat. Point to the dog. Point to the butterfly. Point to the elephant. Point to the mouse. Point to the narrators.

Oral language level 2+:

Name the characters? (elephant, cat, mouse, dog, butterfly)

 

 

 


Page 3 Text: A dog is sleeping. “I want to sleep, too!” says the cat.

Oral language level 1:

Point to the dog.  Point to the cat.

Oral language level 2+:

What is happening? (The dog is sleeping.  The cat is looking in the window.)

Identify the part of the window called the window sill. The window sill is the bottom ledge of the window.

Infer:

What do you think the cat is thinking?

Retell the setup of the story:  One day a dog is sleeping on a rug (mat).  A cat comes to the window and sees the dog.  The cat wants to sleep too.


Page 4 Text: The cat  is sleeping. “I want to sleep, too!” says the mouse.

Oral language level 1:

Point to the cat. Point to the dog. Point to the mouse.

Oral language level 2+:

What is happening? (The cat is sleeping on the back of the dog. A mouse comes to the window The mouse wants to sleep too. )

Infer: What do you think the mouse is thinking?

Retell the first event:  First, the cat gets on the back of the dog and falls asleep. Next, the mouse comes to the window and wants to sleep too.


Page 5 Text: The mouse is sleeping. “I want to sleep, too!” says the butterfly.

Oral language level 1:

Point to the mouse. Point to the dog.  Point to the butterfly. Point to the cat.

Oral language level 2+:

Say: We can say that the butterfly lands on the window sill. Ask students to repeat: “The butterfly lands on the window sill.”

Infer: What do you think the butterfly is thinking?

Discuss with students the sizes of the animals are getting smaller and smaller.

Which animal is the biggest?  Which animal is the smallest?

little/small/bigger/biggest

Retell what happens: One day a dog is sleeping in the house when a cat comes to the window. The cats thinks “I want to sleep too.” Next, the cat gets on the back of the dog and falls asleep. Then, a mouse comes to the window and sees the dog and cat sleeping.  The mouse wants to sleep too. So the mouse gets on the back of the cat.  After that, a butterfly lands on the window sill and wants to sleep too.  


Page 6 Text: “The butterfly is sleeping. “I want to sleep, too!” says the elephant.

Oral language level 1:

Point to the butterfly.  Point to the elephant. Point to the mouse.

Is the elephant big or little? (big)

Oral language level 2+:

What is happening now?(All the animals/characters are sleeping, and the elephant is peeking in the window.)

Infer:

What do you think the elephant is thinking?

What is the problem? (The elephant is very big (huge, enormous).


Page 7 Text: Oh,no! The elephant is too big!

Oral language level 1: Point to the characters that are sleeping. Name the characters that are sleeping.  Point to the character that is not sleeping? Name the character that is not sleeping.

Oral language level 2+:

Infer:

What do you think will happen next?.

Where would the elephant have to sleep? (Guide students to think about size order of the animals as well as other places the elephant could sleep.)

Retell what has happened at the end of the story.

All the animals were sleeping. Then along came an elephant. He peeked in the window.  The elephant wanted to sleep too, but he was too big.

Activity 6 Model Retell of the Story

Teacher uses sequence words (next, then, after that, finally, and the connecting words but and so,  to model a retell of the story.)

Retell the story: One day a dog is sleeping on the rug in the house when a cat comes to the window. The cats thinks “I want to sleep too”. Next, the cat gets on the back of the dog and falls asleep. Then, a mouse comes to the window and sees the dog and cat sleeping.  The mouse wants to sleep too. So the mouse gets on the back of the cat.  After that, a butterfly lands on the window sill and wants to sleep too. So, the butterfly gets on the back of the mouse. Finally, a huge elephant comes to the window. The elephant wants to sleep too, but he is too big.

Activity 7 Collaborative Conversation/Think-Pair-Share

Discuss with your partner what you think the elephant should do?

Academic Language Frame: I think the elephant should  ______________________.

 

What part of the story did you think was funny?

Academic Language Frame: I think it was funny when _____________________________.

Activity 8 Assessment

Have students point to words as they read the story.

  • Observe speech-to print-match. Watch student read the book and observe if they are pointing to each word.
  • Check to see if students can read the high-frequency words: for, a, is, I , want, to, too, says, the, oh, no
  • Ask students to tell the beginning sound in the words: cat /k/, mouse/m/, dog /d/, narrator /n/, butterfly /b/, big /b/.
  • Ask students to tell the last sound they hear and feel the words: big /g/, cat/t/, dog /g/, mouse /s/.

Oral Language Level 1

Ask students to point to animals ( butterfly, elephant, dog, cat, mouse), in the story, as you name them.

Oral Language Level 2+

  • Ask students to retell the story using sequence words (next, then, after that, finally)
  • Ask students: What was the problem in the story? (The elephant is too big to sleep with the other animals).

Activity 1 Word Sort by Vowel Pattern

Purpose: This activity prepares students to read words in the text by themselves.

Prepare:

1. Write each word on a card.

sleeps

2. Make a place for students to sort the words using the headers in the chart below.

3. Divide the two-syllable words (multisyllabic) into syllables and underline the syllable that fits the pattern.  For example, in the window, the second syllable is highlighted (-dow) and would be placed under the header for vowel digraphs.  In the vowel digraph -ow, the letter w functions as a vowel and forms the silent vowel in the vowel team signaling that the o makes its long vowel sound.

win/dow

 

Word Sort by Vowel Syllable Pattern

Directions:

  1. Show students a word card.
  2. Identify the syllable pattern (Open, Closed, Magic e, Vowel digraph team, R-controlled, Diphthong vowel team, C+le).  
  3. Model how to pronounce the words according to the vowel syllable pattern.
  4. Place the card under the correct vowel syllable pattern header.
  5. Have students read all the words in the same column.
Open  Closed  Magic e Vowel Digraph

R-Controlled

Dipthong

Consonant+le

me/ows rug take sleeps flut/ters me/ows set/tle
but/ter/fly win/dow shakes peeks whis/pers mouse
co/zy nap creeps but/ter/fly
lands a/sleep
still squeaks
whis/pers win/dow
flut/ters
trum/pets
sud/den
set/tles
Open  Closed 
me/ows rug
but/ter/fly win/dow
co/zy nap
lands
still
whis/pers
flut/ters
trum/pets
sud/den
set/tles
Magic e Vowel Digraph
take sleeps
shakes peeks
creeps
a/sleep
squeaks
win/dow

R-Controlled

Dipthong

flut/ters me/ows
whis/pers mouse
but/ter/fly

Consonant+le

set/tle

Activity 2 Phoneme-Grapheme Map

Purpose: This activity helps students to connect the sounds they hear in words with their spelling.  

  • The boxes are sound boxes and represents the number of phonemes (speech sounds) in each word, not the number of letters.   
  • Note that a vowel digraph teams uses one box for one sound (e.g., peeks)
  • In the word squeak, qu represents the consonant blend /kw/, so the letter q is written in one box and the letter u in its own box.
  • Remind students that the last sound spells the third person singular ending of the verb (-s).  We use this when we talk about someone by name, a singular animal,  or use the pronouns he, she, it.
s l ee p s sleeps
p ee k s peeks
c r ee p s creeps
s q u ea k s squeaks

Activity 3 Connecting the Spelling of the Word to its Grammatical Meaning

  • Make this chart and write and read the word sums with students.
  • Example of how to read the word sum: “s-l-ee-p plus s is rewritten as s-l-eep-s.”

             “P-ee-k +s is rewritten as p-ee-k-s. When you say the vowel digraph team ee, say it    fast to remind students the two letters spell one sound.

  • Listen to how the letter s is pronounced at the end of the word.
  • The last column of the chart gives a synonym for the bolded word, to help students learn the meaning of the verbs in the book.  

Inflectional Ending –s as a Tense Marker

Page Example from the book Base word Word Sum Pronunciation of ending Synonym
2 The dog sleeps on
the rug.
sleep s-l-ee-p+s → sleeps /s/ naps
2 The cat peeks in
the window.
peek p-ee-k+s → peeks /s/ looks quickly
3 So, the cat creeps
in and falls asleep
on the dog’s back.
creep c-r-ee-p+s → creeps /s/ moves slowly
and carefully
3 “I want to take a
nap, too,” squeaks
the rat.
squeak s-q-u-ea-k+s → squeaks /s/ squeal,
whimper, peep

Activity 4 Close Reading with Text-Dependent Questions

Directions:

After reading the story once, use the following questions and discussion starters to guide a close re-read of the story. Ask students questions for each page to connect the text and the illustrations.  Use the ‘Note to Teacher’ for additional ideas on what to talk about with students.  Use think-pair-share to have students discuss their answer with a partner. Guide students to use evidence from the text and illustrations to support their answer.  In think-pair-share, students discuss the answer to a question with a partner before answers are shared.

Picture Questions Note to Teacher
Predict the characters and setting from the title and picture on the cover.

What do you think the author is trying to tell you from the title and cover illustration?

Why might the dog need or want to take a nap?

The title says, “Naptime.” Ask students:

Guide students to understand that naptime is a compound word that means time to nap.

What is the setting of the story?

What does settle down mean?
What does cozy mean?

Where did the dog decide to nap?

Guide students to understand new vocabulary:
“settle down” is a way to describe getting ready to do something
Synonym: calm downCozy is used as an adjective to describe something that feels comfortable.
What does the cat want?
How do you know?What word did the author choose to tell how the cat talks?
Guide students to find evidence of what the cat wants?
Have students read what the cat says in quotations.Guide students to understand that the word “meow” replaces a word like “says.”
What do you predict will happen next?

What sounds are the animals making?

Have students give evidence for their predictions. (The mouse in the window.)

Guide students to recognize the word choice of the author (squeaks). Help students see the nuance of meaning using these verbs. For example, squeak is the tiny sound that a mouse makes.

What do you predict will happen next?

How does the author describe the way a butterfly moves?
Why does the butterfly land on the window sill?

Have students give evidence for their predictions. (The butterfly is on the window sill.)

Guide to students to understand why the author wrote “lands on the windowsill.”(because butterflies fly)

What word (verb) tells us how the butterfly moves?

How did the author let you know that something big was coming?

Talk about the meaning of the word flutter has to do with flapping wings.

Focus students’ attention on the words “All of a sudden the rug shakes”.

“All of a sudden” is a signal that something is about to happen.

Can the elephant join the other animals napping? Explain your answer.

Why does it say “trumpeted” to describe what the elephant says?
How do you think the elephant feels?

What might happen next?
What might the elephant decide to do?
Will the other animals wake up?

Guide students thinking about how the elephant’s appearance at the window breaks the story pattern.

The word “trumpeted” has to do with how loud elephants sound when they make sound with their long trunk.

Infer how the elephant might feel when he is so sleepy, but he is too big to pile on top. Link the size to his dilemma. Suggest feeling words such as: upset, disappointed.

Invite students to write the next page of the story.

Activity 5 Summary Strategy to Summarize the Story

Purpose: Use this chart to help your students recall and organize their story summary to get at the cause and effect relationships in the story.

Prompt Questions to ask students Example responses

(write student responses on chart)
Somebody wanted… What did the dog want to do? The dog wanted to take a nap
Because Why do you think the dog wanted to nap? Because he was tired.
But… Who else wanted to nap? But other animals also wanted to take a nap too.
So… So what did the cat, rat, and the butterfly do? So one by one, the cat, the mouse, and the butterfly piled on top of the dog and fell asleep.
Then… What happens that is unexpected? Then an elephant came along and looked in the window. He was sleepy too. But he was also too big to get on top of the pile of sleeping animals!

Activity 6 Text-to-Text Connection

Purpose: This strategy encourages children to gain a deeper understanding of their reading by making connections to other books they have previously read (for example, Hippo’s Muddy Mud).   

Academic Language Frame Questions to ask
students
Example responses

(write student responses on chart)
__________________
reminds me of
___________
because
__________________.
Does this story remind you of any others you have read? Why or why not? Guide students to identify similarities and differences between stories.
For example:
Hippo, in Hippo’s Muddy Mud, reminds me of the elephant in Naptime because they are both huge animals.
Both stories are
_______________
because
__________________.
What was the same about Hippo’s Muddy Mud and Naptime? Guide students to identify similarities and differences between stories.
For example:
Both stories are funny because of the big animal at the end who is too big.
Both stories are about animals that want the same thing.
In ____________ the
____________, but
in ____________ the
_______________,
What was different about Naptime from Hippo’s Muddy Mud? Guide students to identify similarities and differences between stories.
For example:
In Hippo’s Muddy Mud the animals want to cool off but in Naptime, the animals all want to take a nap.

Activity 7 Prepare Students to Use Past Tense in Their Story Recount

Purpose: Help students recount the story using the verbs in the past tense. Notice the pronunciation of the past tense –ed inflection to form the  past tense verb. Practice using the verbs by talking about the story (e.g., The cat crept into the house and climbed on the back of the dog and fell asleep).

Base Verb Past Tense Base Verb
want wanted /id/
settle settled /d/
sleep slept Irregular past
tense
climb combed /d/
creep crept Irregular past
tense
fall asleep fell asleep Irregular past
tense
decide decided /id/
fly flew Irregular past
tense
flutter fluttereded /d/
realize realized /d/
feel felt Irregular past
tense

Activity 8 Model Recount of the Story

Purpose: Students can practice using sequence words (next, then, after that) connecting words (but, so, because), feeling words (e.g., disappointed, worried) , and mental verbs (wished, decided, wanted, realized) to retell or recount the story. They can use the past tense of the verbs to retell/recount the story.  In this process students will convey story relationships.

 

  • Sequence words, words that kids have to pick up for retell/recount
  • For example, decided, “ The cat looked into the window and decided to nap on the dog”
  • Feeling words: disappointed “ The elephant was disappointed that he could not fit in the window because he wanted to take a nap too.”
  • realized/decided  “The elephant realized he was too big to fit in the window.”

 

One lazy afternoon, the dog wanted to take a nap. He settled down on the rug and fell asleep.   While he slept, a cat came to the window and saw the dog napping.  She also wanted to take a nap.  So she crept into the house, and fell asleep on the dog.  While the cat and the dog slept, a mouse came by the window.  He wanted to take a nap too.  He decided to jump over the window and into the house. So , he fell asleep on top of the cat and dog.  Then, a butterfly fluttered by the window. She saw the mouse, cat and dog sleeping and decided that she wanted to take a nap also.  She flew into the window and fell asleep on the back of the mouse.   The animals were fast asleep when all of a sudden the ground began to shake!  What could that be? This time it was an elephant.  He was sleepy too! The elephant  wanted to nap also, but he realized he was too big to get on the pile of animals. So the elephant felt very disappointed.