What Does Datiz See in the Sea?

Lesson Guide

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Activity 1 Explore the Book Cover and Character Page

Page 1 – 2

Direct students’ attention to the illustration on the book cover. Read the title of the book to students, What Does Datiz See in the Sea? Lead students to infer what the book will be about using the photograph and the book title. Use the questions and think-aloud models below to help students make a prediction with evidence from the title and illustration. Connect the title of the book to the photograph on the cover.


Make Predictions About the Story

Use the questions to explore the book title and the photograph. Suggested answers are in the parentheses. If students give short answers, model a complete sentence.

  • What do you see? (a boy with a snorkel, swimming in the ocean/sea)
  • What do you think is the topic of this book? (sea or sea creatures)
  • Who is the character on the picture? (Datiz)
  • What word in the title tells what the book is about? (sea)

Model Think Aloud to Describe the Cover Illustrations

The following bullet points are statements for the teacher to model metacognitive thinking (thinking about what you are reading, using evidence to make predictions). The teacher can model using the academic language sentence frames that follow.

  • I see a photograph, which makes me think this book tells us information.
  • The title says, What does Datiz See in the Sea? so I think the book will be about things in the ocean or sea.
  • I notice the title has the words see and sea. (Point to each word and have students name the letters.) The different letters or spelling tells us the words mean different things.  S-e-e means to look at something with your eyes. S-e-a means the ocean.
  • I wonder what Datiz will see in the ocean? Let’s read and find out.

Model Inferences That Can be Made From Pictures and Words

  • I can infer that Datiz will look at sea creatures that live in the ocean because I read the word sea that means the same thing as ocean in the title.

Academic Language Sentence Frames

Use the academic language sentence frames for students to practice making inferences about the cover.  Post the sentence frame on the board for students to see.

Oral Language Level 1:

Have students point to parts of the illustration and make connections between the illustration and the words in the title (point to Datiz, point to the word sea.  Point to a sea creature.)

Oral Language Level 2:

I see _______________, SO, I think ________________.

I predict that __________________.

​I think this book will be about ____________because ______________.

I predict this book will be about _________ because ______________.

Example: I think the book will be about sea creatures because Datiz is swimming in the sea.

Show the language cue word because to help students use this word to give a reason for their prediction.


TEACHER PAGE:

Read page 2 to students to help them understand what they will read about in the book.

 

Activity 2 Explore the Picture Dictionary

Page 3

Point to each image and ask students if they recognize what animal it is. Let them guess first. If a student gets it right, have the whole class repeat the word. If they do not know, tell them the answer and have them repeat it.

Example:

Teacher: What animal is this? (Points to the turtle.)

Student: It’s a  turtle.

Teacher: Yes, that’s right.  What kind of turtle is it? It’s a sea turtle. Everyone, repeat after me: sea turtle.

Class: sea turtle.

Make sure that students understand and can pronounce this vocabulary before moving on to reading the story.

Notice: The word fish is in the word starfish.

Activity 3 Word Work | Foundational skills

Prepare to read pages 3-9

Before leading students through a guided reading of the book, What Does Datiz See in the Sea?, prepare students to apply what they know about words, letters, and sounds to help them recognize what the words in the book say.  This will include practice thinking about the sounds in words and using the first letter of words to confirm what the word says.


Phonological Awareness Practice

Use pictures when doing this activity. Point to the pictures in the book that show the words.

  • Clap and count syllables: octopus (3), fish (1), starfish(2), jellyfish (3), eel (1), turtle (2), sea (1), Datiz (2)
  • Identify the initial sound of words, how to make the sound, and how to spell it for the words: fish /f/, sea /s/,  turtle /t/, whale /w/, shark /sh/.  
  • Practice How to Say the Sounds: /sh/, /f/, /w/, /t/, /j/,/s/

Practice how to make the sounds: /sh/, /f/, /w/, /t/, /j/, /s/

Check the phonics section of the website to review how to teach the sounds of English consonants. Use multisensory cues to help students learn the sounds made by the letters f, w, t, j, s,  and the digraph sh. Focus on the letters your students have difficulty with.

Example:

Teacher: What sound does fish start with?

Students: /f/

Teacher: What letter makes the sound /f/?

Students: The letter f.

Teacher: That’s right! The word fish starts with an f. Repeat after me: /f/, /f/, /f/ fish.

Students: /f/, /f/, /f/ fish.

Activity 4 A Guided First Reading of the Book

  • Teacher guides students to read each page of the text using the guided instruction that follows.
  • Read the predictable part of the text, and guide students to figure out the new word or words on each page.
  • Confirm the new word from the picture by identifying its  beginning and ending sound.
  • Ask text-dependent questions about each page of text to connect the pictures with the words.  

Page 4 Text: Datiz sees a starfish.

Guided Group Reading

Teacher says:

  • Let’s read the part of the sentence we know together: Datiz sees a______.
  • What do you see in the picture? (A starfish)
  • What sound does starfish begin with? (/s/). How do we spell the /s/ sound? (letter s)
  • Let’s clap many syllables is starfish? (2) So starfish is a longer word that begins with the letter s. Do you see a word that could be starfish? (the last word). That makes sense with the picture.  
  • Find the word fish in the word starfish.
  • Read the sentence with me.
  • Now read the sentence to me.

Page 4 Text: Datiz sees a sea turtle.

Guide Group Reading

Teacher says:

  • Let’s read the part of the sentence we know together: Datiz sees a ______.
  • What do you see in the picture? (a turtle) We call this a sea turtle because it lives in the sea.
  • Let’s read and point to the two different words that say sea and see just like in the title.
  • What sound does turtle begin with? (/t/). How do we spell the /t/ sound? (letter t)   
  • Let’s clap how many syllables in turtle. (2) So turtle is a longer word that begins with the letter t. Do you see a word that could be turtle? (the last word). That makes sense with the picture.
  • What does the word right before turtle say? (sea)
  • Read the sentence with me.
  • Now read the sentence to me.

Page 5 Text: Datiz sees an octopus.

Guided Group Reading

Teacher says:

  • Let’s read the part of the sentence we know together: Datiz sees ______.
  • What do you see in the picture? (an octopus) We say an octopus because the first sound in the word octopus is a vowel.
  • Octopus begins with the letter o and that makes the open-mouth vowel sound /o/ like what you say when the doctor looks at your throat.  
  • Let’s clap how many syllables in octopus. (3)  So octopus is a longer word that begins with the letter o that makes an “ah” like when you open your mouth and the doctor says, “Say ah.” Do you see a word that could be octopus? (the last word). That makes sense with the picture.
  • Read the sentence with me.
  • Now you read the sentence to me.

Page 6 Text: Datiz sees an eel.

Guided Group Reading

Teacher says:

  • Let’s read the part of the sentence we know together: Datiz sees an ______.
  • What do you see in the picture? (an eel) We say an eel because the first sound in the word eel is a vowel.
  • Eel begins with the letters ee and that makes the a smiley vowel sound /ee/.
  • Watch me smile as I say eel.
  • What is the last sound in the word eel? (/l/) How do we spell the sound /l/? ( letter l). Do you see a word that ends with the letter l? (the last word). That makes sense with the picture.
  • Read the sentence with me.
  • Now read the sentence to me.

Page 7 Text: Datiz sees some fish.

Guided Group Reading

Teacher says:

  • Let’s read the part of the sentence we know together: Datiz sees ______.
  • What do you see in the picture? (some fish)
  • I can’t say a fish, because there are lots of fish. I see a word that starts with the letter s. I think the word is some. There are some fish.
  • Fish begins with the sound /f/. How do we make the /f/ sound? (the letter f).
  • What is the last sound in the word fish? (/sh/) How do we spell the /sh/ sound? (the letters sh). Do you see a word that ends with the letters sh? (the last word). That makes sense with the picture.
  • Read the sentence with me.
  • Now read the sentence to me.

Page 8 Text: Datiz sees some jellyfish.

  • Let’s read the part of the sentence we know together: Datiz sees ______.
  • What do you see in the picture? (a jellyfish)
  • I see one big jellyfish, but do you see a lot of little jellyfish swimming near the top of the water?
  • I can’t say a jellyfish, because there’s more than one. I see a word that begins with the letter s. I think this word says some.
  • What sound does jellyfish begin with? (/j/) How do we spell the /j/ sound? (letter j)
  • Let’s clap the syllables in jellyfish. (3)  So jellyfish is a longer word that begins with the letter j. Do you see a word that could be jellyfish? (the last word). That makes sense with the picture.
  • Read the sentence with me.
  • Now you read the sentence to me.

Page 9 Text: Datiz sees a whale shark.

Guided Group Reading

Teacher says:

  • Let’s read the part of the sentence we know together: Datiz sees a __________.
  • What do you see in the picture? (a big shark)
  • That is actually called a whale shark because it is so big. It is a huge shark.
  • What sound does whale begin with? (/w/) How do we spell the /w/ sound? (digraph  wh)
  • What sound does shark begin with? (/sh/) How do we spell the /sh/ sound? (digraph sh)
  • Read the sentence with me.
  • Now you read the sentence to me.

Activity 5 Reread the text for fluency. My turn, Your Turn.

The teacher reads a page of text, and then the students read the same text. Reread the whole book. Observe students to see if they are pointing to the words as they say them (speech-to print-match).

Example:

Teacher: “My turn. Datiz sees a starfish. Your turn.”

Students: “Datiz sees a starfish.

Activity 6 Third Reading of the Book

Close Reading of the Text with Text-Dependent Questions

Reread each page of text with students and ask text-dependent questions that will help students to understand the information in the book and the author’s word choice (vocabulary). Reread parts of the read-aloud version, Datiz and Whale Shark, to students , as necessary, to help answer some questions about the pictures in the book.


Page 4 Text: Datiz sees a starfish.

Oral Language Level 1:

Point to the starfish. Count how many arms on the starfish.(5)

Oral Language Level 2 +:

Where is the starfish? (in the ocean on a coral reef)

Infer: How do you think the starfish holds on to the coral reef? (It has suction cups under its arms.)


Page 5 Text: Datiz sees a sea turtle.

Oral Language Level 1:

Point to the sea turtle. Point to the sea turtle’s flippers.

Oral Language Level 2 +:

What kind of turtle do you see? (sea turtle)

Infer: How does the sea turtle swim? (with its flippers)

 


Page 6 Text: Datiz sees an octopus.

Oral Language Level 1:

Point to the octopus. Point to the octopus’ arms. What color is the octopus?

Oral Language Level  2 +:

What do you see on the octopus’ arms? (suction cups)

How many arms do you see?

How many arms does an octopus have? (eight) We call them tentacles. Each arm or tentacle helps the octopus move in a different direction.

Infer: What do you think the suction cups are for? (to help it hold on to sea coral or rocks or things to eat such as crabs or clams)


Page 7 Text: Datiz sees an eel.

Oral Language Level 1:

Point to the eel. Point to the coral.

Oral Language Level 2 +:  

Where is the eel hiding? ( in a coral cave)

Infer: How does the eel move? (They have fins and they move like a ribbon.)

 


Page 8 Text: Datiz sees some fish.

Oral Language Level 1:

Point an orange fish. Count how many orange fish you see.

Oral Language Level 2 +:

Describe how many fish you see.

Say: When a whole bunch of the same fish swim together we call is a school of fish.

 


Page 9 Text: Datiz sees some jellyfish.

Oral Language Level 1:

Point to the big jellyfish. Count how jellyfish you see.  Say: There are many.

Oral Language Level 2 +:

Describe the jellyfish.

Infer: Why does Datiz need to be careful around the jellyfish? (because they can sting)

 


Page 10 Text: Datiz sees a whale shark.

Oral Language Level 1:

Point to the big whale fish.  Point to the spots on the whale fish.

Oral Language Level 2 +:

Describe the whale shark.

What else do you see around the whale shark? ( tiny little pilot fish)

Infer: Why is the whale shark’s mouth opened so wide? (because it is a filter feeder and it catches tiny plants called plankton to eat)

Activity 7 Think-Pair-Share

Ask: What animal in the sea would you like to learn more about? Explain to your partner why that animal is interesting to you.

Academic Language Sentence Frame:

I learned that ______________________.

I want to learn more about ____________.

(Example: I learned that an octopus has many arms with suction cups. I want to learn more about jellyfish.)

Activity 8 Assessment

  • Observe speech-to print-match. Watch student read the book and point. Observe if they are pointing to each word as they say it.
  • Check to see if students can read the high-frequency words out of the text: what, does, sees, in, the, a, some
  • Ask students to tell the beginning sound in the words: (starfish /s/, turtle /t/, jellyfish /j/, shark /sh/, sea /s/)